Archived entries for Collaboration

a heap of language #002: radical publishing

Please join us for the second instalment of a heap of language, an ongoing event series organised between Paper Visual Art Journal and the School of Visual Culture at NCAD.

For this event we have invited a number of contributors to speak about radical (artists’, small press, activist, and samizdat) publishing.

A publication, compiled by current students of the MA/MFA Art in the Contemporary World, will also be launched. This publication has been collaboratively produced in response to the idea of cohabitation.

Contributors: Christodoulos Makris, Sam Riviere, David Crowley, Simon Cutts and Erica Van Horn, as well as students of the MA/MFA Art in the Contemporary World.

4 pm: transcription writing workshop with Christodoulos Makris [numbers limited, separate sign up]
6 pm: talks at the Goethe-Institut, Merrion Square
8 pm: publication launch at the Goethe-Institut, Merrion Square

This event is kindly funded by the Arts Council of Ireland. All aspects of this event are free but booking is required. Separate registration for the workshop, beginning 4 pm, departing from the Goethe-Institut.

Tickets here.

Opening: Pauline Oliveros, Software for People @ The Goethe Institut

Exhibition at 126 Artist-Run Gallery

Anticipated Fictions: Monumental Configurations at 126 Artist-Run Gallery from Saturday 27 April to 12 May.

126 Artist-Run Galley,
15 Saint Bridget’s Place,
The Hidden Valley,
Galway,
Ireland

Emma Brennan’s Heed To The Mound, reviewed by Aoife Banks

Six contorted, heaving bodies, six mounds of dough, arms and legs entwined with lengths of proved flour, yeast and water. Twisting, manipulating limbs and torsos. Cold, thick slaps of bread dough against concrete. Brushing of feet and fingers, the clatter of elbows, palms and kneecaps against the flour sifted floor. Dusty sweeping of limbs. Panting fury. Laboured breaths. Exhausted sighs. Groans of resistance; of perseverance. Our bodies; our battleground.

Emma Brennan’s authored durational performance “Heed, to the Mound”, presents a group of women negotiating space through the movement of mounds of bread dough within the space of The Complex for Dublin’s 2018 Fringe Festival. Taking place over the course of 3 hours, physical exertion takes it’s toll on the performers as they use their bodies to manoeuvre and manipulate mounds of bread dough, equivalent to the weight of their own bodies, across the performance space. Heed brings to the fore the question of space, how it is occupied, who occupies it and how we negotiate our bodies accordingly. Moving mounds through the tumultuous terrain of gender politics proves no easy feat, as the excruciating and exhaustive work quite fittingly erodes these women mentally and physically throughout the duration of the performance. With puffed red faces and sweat glistened necks, the performers roll, twist, knead, push and pull their dough with ferocious determination evoking an emotional response from spectators. As tightly clenched fists punch into dough and miniature mountains inch across concrete we see the slow progression of women’s rights throughout history, we see the everyday instances of aggression and violence toward female bodies, we hear the hurt and fury in the exasperated groans of women on the battleground of Ireland’s sociopolitical landscape.

The undervaluing of women’s labour throughout history and the unseen emotional labour expected of women within contemporary society are brought to the fore in Heed. Taking inspiration from her grandmother’s tradition of baking brown bread for the family, Brennan questions the devaluation of homemaking skills, deemed as “women’s work”, in Irish society. In rural Irish homesteads, the process of baking seemed to go almost unacknowledged and undervalued compared to the work of men’s labour on the farm or outside of the home. Heed, to the Mound points a finger at society’s valuation of the workload associated with the traditional role of the homemaker. Through the poignant actions of a group of women labouring intensively, exhausting every part of their bodies, over masses of dough, attention is drawn to the intensity of this work and respect that must be commanded of the act of making. Heed emphasises the importance of valuing these acts of unseen and undervalued labour in opposition to the emphasis placed on working for monetary gain within a capitalist system.

Brennan refers to her process of preparing the dough as a metaphor for the creation of life. “With flour and water, we can create a living, breathing body, something which can grow through proofing.” The genderless, sexless, mounds of dough present each performer with an opportunity to experience a sense of self without the weight of gender bias, stigma, discrimination, fear or insecurity. With pressed backs, stomping feet and curled fingers these women manipulate their very being across a public platform. Each women tending to their own projected doughy selves; some rip chunks out and squeeze together again, some stretch and roll out for lengths becoming thinner and thinner with each inch, some repeat the pulling and folding of flaps; the slapping of flesh and dough reverberating through the room. When kneading dough you cannot be heavy-handed – it changes the entire consistency and texture, you can taste a bread baked with love or anger. A handful of dough receiving the blunt force, or gentle caress, of emotion; do our bodies receive the same attention from the space we inhabit? Politics are a tactile experience, and the daily micro-aggressive touch of our oppressive sociopolitical sphere lingers in our physicality and psyche alike.

The socio-political landscape of contemporary Ireland has been aflood with dissent regarding the relationship between the state and women’s bodies. In 2018, Irish society saw the culmination of decades of protest in the passing of the movement to repeal the 8th Amendment from the Irish constitution. The year also marks the centenary of women’s partial suffrage in Ireland; 1918 was the first time Irish women (aged 30 or older who were university graduates or owned a certain amount of property) were permitted by law to vote and run in parliamentary elections. Both movements saw women collectively struggling against structures of power that sought to oppress and define them physically, mentally, socially and politically. From the violent beatings of protesting suffragettes at the hands of police forces to the vice grip of the 8th Amendment and the mobilisation of women in the campaign to repeal it, the female body indefinitely exists as a site of conflict in a constant struggle against its aggressive politicisation. Taking place just three months after the referendum on the 8th amendment was held, Heed, to the Mound allows for a form of post-repeal conflict resolution to play out on the concrete floor of The Complex. The struggle of dissent against patriarchal structures of power echoes through the space as violent slaps of an elongated limb of dough reverberate through the concrete floor. Forcefully, in spite of her evident fatigue, a woman thrusts it behind her shoulder to gain momentum before hurtling it down upon the flour scattered ground. Some of the dough breaks away to hit a nearby wall. She repeats her action; the dough catches her behind the neck with a smack to her upper back; there can be no disruption without trauma. She perseveres.

Exhausted, and seemingly close to defeat, one woman halts her movements. The mass she had been inching across the space has begun to stick to the undredged floor and each push is met with increased resistance. As she heaves her body upon the mound to catch her breath and rest for a moment, she is spotted by the human dredger. This woman stands watching over the others, smiling gently, a mountain of flour in hand. Upon seeing distress, she tends to the struggling womens needs by sifting flour with great care around the stubborn masses of dough. A moment later, the performer is moving again. In times of mass dissent against oppressive forces of power, it is collectivity and care for ourselves and one another that carry us through. We must remember to pay heed to the mound.

IMMA Presents: A Vague Anxiety

IMMA Presents: A Vague Anxiety
12 Apr 2019–18 Aug 2019

Opening Thursday 11 April 18:00 – 20:00

A new group exhibition of emerging artists addressing new issues of the Generation Y.

Featuring ACW Alumni Marie Farrington and including work by Cristina Bunello, Saidhbhín Gibson, Helio León, plattenbaustudio, Brian Teeling and Susanne Wawra, with performances by Alexis Blake and Stasis.

You, Me and Everything In Between workshop conducted by ACW students in the RHA

Art in the Contemporary World work with the RHA for Learning and Public Engagement, Futures Series 3, Episode 2 with Dublin Youth Dance Company

Working closely with the RHA, Katy Fitzpatrick and Róisín Bohan for the Public Engagement and Learning program for the current Futures exhibition, ACW students, Brendan Fox, Natalie Pullen and Éimear Regan developed You, Me and Everything In Between. A theatrical workshop loosely based around Augusto Boal’s Theatre of the Oppressed, where participants were encouraged to manifest a performative narrative connecting the exhibition content. The artists featuring in Futures Series 3, Episode 2 exhibition are Bassam Al-Sabah, Cecilia Danell, Laura Fitzgerald, Jennifer Mehigan, Joanne Reid and Marcel Vidal. The work on display by each artist in Futures is unconnected and seemingly disparate as the exhibition is a display of their own personal practice rather than a group show that relates to a specific theme or greater narrative. The challenge set forth in the workshop was to develop a constellation between the artists’ work on display, with an outcome of producing and creating a wholly separate piece of performance art. The artists in the Futures exhibition also contributed to the workshop by donating personal objects for a further insight into their world. Among the objects donated were a paint pot cast from layers upon layers of paint, a silver mask and a metal rod. Members of the Dublin Youth Dance Company directed by Mariam Ribon, were invited to participate in the 3-hour-long workshop which took place on Saturday 15 December. The first half of the workshop began with the 11 participants viewing and taking in the work, followed by a meditation and then contained a series of exercises influenced by Boal’s practice where there was a discussion and consequently where the generation of ideas for a narrative emerged. During the second half of the workshop the DYDC participants were divided into three groups and were instructed to develop their narrative of the exhibition through three “moments” that established a final performance. Materials were provided by the facilitators Fox, Pullen and Regan to aid the development and theatricality of the narrative, encouraging the participants to engage in producing a fully embodied piece of art. The dancers infused themselves into the workshop and the outcome was outstanding. Each group performed their finished piece within the space with the artworks as a backdrop. The dancers’ commitment to the workshop was phenomenal and the creative energy generated in the space was quite special.

Éimear Regan, MA Art in the Contemporary World

All photographs by Brendan Fox

Young Hearts Run Free Collective turns 10!

Young Hearts – www.youngheartsrunfree.ie turns 10 in December, and to celebrate the milestone there’s a mini-festival from 7th – 9th December at venues around Dublin city.

As ever, all the proceeds go to the Simon Community -The project/collective was started in 2008 by Siobhán Kane, wanting to promote the creative community, as well as raise money for this homeless organisation.

There are so many great people contributing, from Emmet Kirwan to David O’Doherty, Katie Kim, Lisa O’Neill, Dreamgun – to grab tickets to any of the events click the link below:

https://www.eventbrite.ie/o/young-hearts-run-free-6319407353

Don’t miss out!

Free event on artists’ writing at Dublin Art Book Fair – Tuesday 27th November

Why do artists write? And do they approach the task of writing differently?

The Art in the Contemporary World MA/ MFA programme at NCAD and Paper Visual Art are hosting an evening of readings at which artists and critics will read their own words, or those of other artists. Speakers include Sue Rainsford, Suzanne Walsh, Fiona Gannon, Jessica Foley, Lily Cahill and others. It will take place on Tuesday 27th November at 6pm in Temple Bar Gallery + Studios, Dublin, as part of the Dublin Art Book Fair 2018.

Free. Open too all. Refreshments served. Please book a place via eventbrite here.

This will be the first of a series of events putting the spotlight on new forms of writing and publishing practices in contemporary art planned for 2018-19.

Make Haste, Slowly at the Return Gallery


Photo Credit: Louis Haugh

Make Haste, Slowly
Return Gallery Goethe-Institut Irland, 37 Merrion Square, Dublin 2.

A collectively curated, scripted, performed, and presented exercise in radical pedagogies by the MA Art in the Contemporary World: Jack Cole, Dominique Crowley, Padraig Cunningham, Stephanie Deady, María del Buey, Tamara Derksen, Nicole Di Sandro, Brendan Fox,
Kate Friedeberg, Valerie Joyce, Seánan Kerr, Heidee Martin, Grainne Murphy, Orlaith Phelan, Natalie Pullen, Éimear Regan, and Laura Skublics.
With artworks and collaborations featuring Basil Al
Rawi, Jane’s Bees, Jasmin Marker, Repeater Collective, Noel Sheridan, John Smith, and David and Sally Shaw-Smith. Presented in the context of Liam Gillick’s Denominator Platform 2018, specially commissioned by Art in the Contemporary World for the Return Gallery.
Make Haste, Slowly is part of Common Denominator: Art in the Contemporary World at the Goethe-Institut, a two-year programme that takes as its starting point Walter Gropius’s term, from which collective knowledges progress. Through exhibitions, events, seminars and more we will interrogate and inhabit what it means in our time to speak of political solidarity, civic standards, or even aesthetic values, and to consider
the relation between common commitments and necessary possibilities of individual belief, expression and action.
Art in the Contemporary World is Ireland’s leading taught MA at the National College of Art & Design in Dublin.
Our students are avid researchers whose focus is to advance a project with the aim of understanding, interrogating,
and expanding the role of contemporary practices and their contexts. ACW is led by Francis Halsall, Declan Long and Sarah Pierce.
Supported by the Goethe-Institut Irland in collaboration with the National College of Art & Design. Special thanks to the Kerlin Gallery and IMMA | Irish Museum of Modern Art.


Opening
30th November 2018 6 – 9pm
Exhibition runs through 12th January 2019
.

Liam Gillick in conversation with the MA Art in the Contemporary World


ACW in conversation under Liam Gillick’s Discussion Island at the Return Gallery. Photo by: Louis Haugh

Goethe Institut Irland
37 Merrion Square
Dublin 2

Wednesday
21st November
6PM

On the occasion of Liam Gillick’s exhibition A Depicted Horse is not a Critique of a Horse at the Kerlin Gallery (23rd November – 19th January) and his Denominator Platform 2018, specially commissioned for the Return Gallery at 37 Merrion Square in connection with Common Denominator: Art in the Contemporary World at the Goethe-Institut, a two-year programme that takes as its starting point Walter Gropius’s term, from which collective knowledges progress. Through exhibitions, events, seminars and more we will interrogate and inhabit what it means in our time to speak of political solidarity, civic standards, or even aesthetic values, and to consider the relation between common commitments and necessary possibilities of individual belief, expression and action.

All welcome. Please note space is limited. Arrive early to avoid disappointment.

Supported by the Goethe-Institut Irland, in collaboration with the National College of Art & Design. Courtesy the Kerlin Gallery.

Contacts
Rosa Abbott
Kerlin Gallery
+353 1 670 9093
gallery@kerlin.ie

Éimear Regan
Art in the Contemporary World
ncadacw@gmail.com
www.acw.ie

Heidrun Rottke
Goethe-Institut Irland
+353 1 680 1100
heidrun.rottke@goethe.de



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