Archived entries for

Spelling Dystopia & Narita Field Trip

Art in the Contemporary World graduate, Barry Kehoe, curates Spelling Dystopia & Narita Field Trip by Nina Fischer & Maroan el Sani opening in MART, Rathmines on Wed October 1st 2014

An exhibition of two video works by Nina Fischer & Maroan el Sani in the Mart Gallery in October 2014 with promotional support by the Irish Museum of Modern Art, the Goethe Institut, The German Embassy and Japanese Embassy. This will include an opening talk (book here) and a participatory workshop run by the artists. There will also be other talks and seminars held during the course of the exhibition involving the National College of Art and Design and the Institute of Art Design and Technology Dun laoghaire. During the four week run the two video works that will be shown are:

Narita Field Trip, looks at how two Tokyo teenagers deal with the experience of encountering a farming community that is fighting against the expansion of Narita airport, a development that threatens to swallow and destroy their farms, homes, livelihood and community. (HD, colour, stereo, 30 min. 2010)

Spelling Dystopia, is a film that explores a community’s memory of the abandoned coal mining centre, Hashima Island, once the most densely populated place on earth, now known as the backdrop for teen horror movie Battle Royale and as a home for Bond villains. (HD,16:9, 2 channel video installation, colour, stereo, 17:25 min)

Irish Film Institute Screening October 2014
There will be a single screening of I live in fear After March 11 hosted by the Experimental Film Club that concerns life in the aftermath of the Fukushima nuclear disaster to be held in the IFI with an artist talk and open discussion.
book here

www.mart.ie
www.facebook.com/events
www.fischerelsani.net

Seminar | Art in the Contemporary Universe

IMMA + MA Art in the Contemporary World, NCAD

Saturday 20 September, 3.00pm – 5.00pm, 2014, Lecture Room, IMMA

(Please take note of the time change above for this event)

This seminar on Art in the Contemporary Universe explores a number of themes prompted by the exhibition The weakened eye of day by Isabel Nolan (IMMA June-September, 2014). The themes under discussion will address vast ideas, involving huge, probably unanswerable questions, such as what Italo Calvino has called overambitious projects in contemporary culture, grand narratives in science and the cosmological turn of recent philosophy. This seminar allows participants to explore realms of science, aesthetics and philosophy within the context of Nolan’s exhibition at IMMA.

Chaired by Paul J. Ennis (Lecturer MA Art in the Contemporary World, NCAD), Dublin. Speakers include; Dr. Fabio Gironi (Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the School of Philosophy, UCD), Dr. David Roden (Lecturer in Philosophy, and author of Posthuman Life: Philosophy at the Edge of the Human). Contributions will also be given by Isabel Nolan (Artist), Francis Halsall and Declan Long (Lecturers, MA Art in the Contemporary World, NCAD).

Further Information

Artists, philosophers, theologians and scientists share a fascination for seemingly intractable problems. Focused on the ‘big picture’ they are tasked with piecing together a sense of meaning in a world that feels increasingly contingent. We no longer live in a familiar world, but in a cold Universe. From the cosmological position we begin to look small, perhaps even insignificant. The sciences, in particular, have been the source of this creeping awareness and artists, philosophers, and theologians find themselves at the mercy of its encroachment upon their traditional territory.

Isabel Nolan’s work evokes precisely this feeling as it emerges in art. The pervasive tremor of deep time is everywhere in it and this same tremor haunts the ground of philosophy. This deep time, the time of an indifferent universe, brings with it a sense of meaninglessness. Can we nonetheless still gain traction on how it goes with the world once we begin to think at these time-scales? How, in the face of deep time, might we fuse together rational or artistic conceptions of the universe without overriding its contingency? What does the future look like when conceived from such a wide angle? It is these questions and more that ‘Art in the Contemporary Universe’ will seek to address.

Schedule: 3.00 – 5.00pm, Lecture Room, IMMA

Introduction | Isabel Nolan (Artist)

Chairpersons Address | Paul J. Ennis completed his PhD in Philosophy at University College Dublin. He is the author of Continental Realism (Zero Books, 2011), the Meillassoux Dictionary (Edinburgh University Press, forthcoming 2014) and Cypherpunk Philosophy (Rowman and Littlefield, forthcoming 2015).

Presentation 1| Manifest and Scientific Images: Arts contribution to our conception of a meaning-less universe

Dr. Fabio Gironi is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the School of Philosophy, University College Dublin. He previously studied at the University of Rome “La Sapienza,” the University of London, and Cardiff University, where he obtained his Ph.D. His work focuses on the philosophy of science and the history of scientific conceptual frameworks, drawing from both analytic and continental sources.

Presentation 2 | How to think like a fossil: art for a posthuman universe.

Dr. David Roden is Lecturer in Philosophy at the Open University. He is author of Posthuman Life: Philosophy at the Edge of the Human. His research has addressed philosophical naturalism, interpretation-based accounts of meaning, computer music and the metaphysics of sound. Recent articles include “The Disconnection Thesis” in The Singularity Hypothesis: A Scientific and Philosophical Assessment and “Nature’s Dark Domain: an argument for a naturalized phenomenology” in the Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement: Phenomenology and Naturalism.

Open Discussion + Questions and Answers | Dr. Fabio Gironi, Dr. David Roden, Paul J. Ennis, Francis Halsall and Declan Long.

19 September 2014
Eva Rothschild and Declan Long in conversation, begins at 5:00pm on Friday the 19th (Culture Night) and is followed by the launch of the exhibition catalogue published by Ridinghouse.

Admission free; early arrival is recommended as places are limited.

www.hughlane.ie/lectures

Open Call for Colony Magazine Submissions

Call and Theme for Issue 3: Magic Visual Art Submissions Information
Online Experimental Literary Magazine

Colony is working with artist, writer and curator Tracy Hanna to develop a visual art section for its online magazine. This section will focus on experimental writing by visual artists and practitioners. Each issue will feature up to eight pieces within this category. There will be an emphasis on written works but image, sound, video, etc. will be considered where relevant to writing as a form and to the theme.
Acceptable formats include: Word Doc, pdf, jpeg or gif (no wider than 950 px), mp3, wav, video that is viewable online (youtube, vimeo, etc.). Text pieces should be no longer than 1000 words, and may be as short as you wish.
A nominal fee of €20 will be paid for each work selected from the open call; payments will be made through Paypal only.
For further information please email colonyediters@gmail.com with ‘visual art inquiry’ marked in the subject bar.
Our submission period spans September 15th to October 15th. Send all submissions to colonyeditors@gmail.com, clearly marking which section you are submitting to in the subject line.
All art is magical in origin…it is intended to make things happen.
- William S Burroughs.
All art is magical, so says leading avant sorcerer Lord Bill Burroughs. If this be so, and you are an artist, then you are also a magician.
How strong is your art? How strong is your Magic?
During the cave-and-carnival cultures of our deep past, a long and tumultuous period, Art emerges as part of the increase in the complexity and anxiety of growing tribal populations involved in intense competition with others for resources, and needing to re-organise themselves politically, martially, and culturally to survive. From the beginning, Art is the sympathetic, manipulable and – crucially – manipulative assistant to the Hunter and the Warrior, and slightly later begins serving as Chief MindWeapon to the Pharisee, Oracle and Tyrant. Only after the Hellenic Golden Age do we begin to think of and produce Art as ‘humanist’ magic intended to deepen the sympathies or broaden the intelligence of its audiences. Yet, even today, who could imagine the survival of – for example – the novel without the powerful Dark Arts of agents, publicists, advertisers…the prize-awarders in their covenly deliberations and redoubts?
Lord Bill is not a lone voice; the history of art is filled with magicians or occultists or cultural engineers, to repeat a term the performance artist, musician and Pandrogyne Genesis P Orridge uses in reference to herm-self.
Think of Yeats and George in their Golden Dawn get-up performing rituals; think of them vigorously conversing with spirits and Demi-gods in the windy light upon the Hill of Allen; think of them trance- writing A Vision together.
Blake talking to his angels and demons. The Bible prophets of old.
The Rolling Stones and The Beatles flirted with The Great Beast Aleister Crowley, who was himself a writer.
Timothy Leary. Robert Anton Wilson.
The English painter Austin Osman Spare, who popularised the sigil method of magic.
Rival contemporary narrators and sorcerers Grant Morrison and Alan Moore.
All Art is magic! All Art is magic! All Art is magic! All Art is magic! All Art is magic!
Magic is made of words and symbols charged with focused energy intended to have results in the material world.
Today’s most successful magician/artists seem to be advertisers, marketers, corporations, media and sports moguls…
Think of the mystical power of the McDonalds M, wooing infants to swoon over ‘happy meals’ sensible rats would reject; think of the handsome and cunning Luciferian, Arthur Guinness, who woos (and then dumps) young musicians, and even young poets, with slithering promises of fame; think of the X in Xmas as a target in your brain.
Consider how many people watch the same shit at the same time on the magic box in the room or are entranced by the magic realm called the internet performing unknown to themselves screen-sex-magic.
As Alan Moore has said, most artists have sold themselves down the river.
WE CALL ON YOU TO TAKE BACK YOUR POWER OF ART and make something magic, spell for us, conjure something effective and useful, causing a ripple effect like those butterfly wings that just might cause a hurricane to spin and blow down all the galleries in Florence.
Make chaos out of order.
Sprout shit out of roses, or, if you’re a sentimental Druid of the Celtic fog, roses out of excrement. If you are the cause, why not choose the effect? Be deliberate, be careful, be brave.
We wait to see how strong your magic art is, charge it up and send it in.
All Art is magic! All Art is magic! All Art is magic! All Art is magic! All Art is magic!
We look forward to hearing from you.
Best wishes, Colony Editors

Art in the Contemporary Universe

IMMA + MA Art in the Contemporary World, NCAD
Saturday 20 September, 3.00pm – 5.00pm, 2014, Lecture Room, IMMA

Please take note of the time change above for this event
This is a free event, bookingbook here

This seminar on Art in the Contemporary Universe explores a number of themes prompted by the exhibition “The weakened eye of day” by Isabel Nolan (IMMA June-September, 2014).

The themes under discussion will address vast ideas, involving huge, probably unanswerable questions, such as what Italo Calvino has called overambitious projects in contemporary culture, grand narratives in science and the cosmological turn of recent philosophy. This seminar allows participants to explore realms of science, aesthetics and philosophy within the context of Nolan’s exhibition at IMMA.
Chaired by Paul J. Ennis (Lecturer MA Art in the Contemporary World, NCAD), Dublin. Speakers include; Dr. Fabio Gironi (Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the School of Philosophy, UCD), Dr. David Roden (Lecturer in Philosophy, and author of Posthuman Life: Philosophy at the Edge of the Human). Contributions will also be given by Isabel Nolan (Artist), Francis Halsall and Declan Long (Lecturers, MA Art in the Contemporary World, NCAD).

Further Information

Artists, philosophers, theologians and scientists share a fascination for seemingly intractable problems. Focused on the ‘big picture’ they are tasked with piecing together a sense of meaning in a world that feels increasingly contingent. We no longer live in a familiar world, but in a cold Universe. From the cosmological position we begin to look small, perhaps even insignificant. The sciences, in particular, have been the source of this creeping awareness and artists, philosophers, and theologians find themselves at the mercy of its encroachment upon their traditional territory.

Isabel Nolan’s work evokes precisely this feeling as it emerges in art. The pervasive tremor of deep time is everywhere in it and this same tremor haunts the ground of philosophy. This deep time, the time of an indifferent universe, brings with it a sense of meaninglessness. Can we nonetheless still gain traction on how it goes with the world once we begin to think at these time-scales? How, in the face of deep time, might we fuse together rational or artistic conceptions of the universe without overriding its contingency? What does the future look like when conceived from such a wide angle? It is these questions and more that ‘Art in the Contemporary Universe’ will seek to address.

Schedule: 3.00 – 5.00pm, Lecture Room, IMMA

Introduction | Isabel Nolan (Artist)

Chairpersons Address | Paul J. Ennis completed his PhD in Philosophy at University College Dublin. He is the author of Continental Realism (Zero Books, 2011), the Meillassoux Dictionary (Edinburgh University Press, forthcoming 2014) and Cypherpunk Philosophy (Rowman and Littlefield, forthcoming 2015).

Presentation 1| Manifest and Scientific Images: Arts contribution to our conception of a meaning-less universe

Dr. Fabio Gironi is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the School of Philosophy, University College Dublin. He previously studied at the University of Rome “La Sapienza,” the University of London, and Cardiff University, where he obtained his Ph.D. His work focuses on the philosophy of science and the history of scientific conceptual frameworks, drawing from both analytic and continental sources.

Presentation 2 | How to think like a fossil: art for a posthuman universe.

Dr. David Roden is Lecturer in Philosophy at the Open University. He is author of Posthuman Life: Philosophy at the Edge of the Human. His research has addressed philosophical naturalism, interpretation-based accounts of meaning, computer music and the metaphysics of sound. Recent articles include “The Disconnection Thesis” in The Singularity Hypothesis: A Scientific and Philosophical Assessment and “Nature’s Dark Domain: an argument for a naturalized phenomenology” in the Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement: Phenomenology and Naturalism.

Open Discussion + Questions and Answers | Dr. Fabio Gironi, Dr. David Roden, Paul J. Ennis, Francis Halsall and Declan Long.

Root of an Unfocus

Art in the Contemporary World graduate Susan Edwards reviews “Root of an Unfocus” by Serena Caulfield

Treading on scrubbed wooden floor boards, into the clean well lit space there is an encounter with a series of turquoise hued paintings and an immediate sense the artist of those paintings adores playing with colour and the materiality of paint. This was the setting of Serena Caulfield’s most recent exhibition of work titled “Root of an Unfocus” in the Berkeley Gallery at Grennan Mill, Thomastown, August 8th thru the 17th, during the Kilkenny Arts Festival, 2014.

The gallery space is a charming building of antiquated origin which combines most effectively with the contemporary sleek body of work that Serena has completed. In fact, on one level before entering the main exhibition space, three of her paintings are in a setting with an old chair, a window nearby, which gives an indication of how well suited her art work is placed in an every day environment. It speaks of intimacy and familiarity. Lucy Lippard wrote in her book, “The Lure of the Local”, that a “lived in landscape becomes a place which implies intimacy; a once lived in landscape can be a place if explored, or remain a landscape if simply observed”. For Caulfield, a Wexford based Irish artist, this sentiment is most keenly felt and portrayed. The owner of a small, quirky gallery in a southern Wexford village, very near the sea, Caulfield clearly uses her locality and place as a springboard for this body of work. The images use rich layers of paint, deep physical mark making and a semi abstract response to the landscape which give a comfortable, settled appearance. A landscape or environment that is explored and not just observed.

The knowledge of her locality is expressed in the various changing aspects of the sea, sky, and other physical objects she encounters while exploring this environment. The blocks of blue tones interspersed with the colourful brush marks are vaguely representational of that physical intrusion into Nature. While a majority of her work shows vast amounts of sky amongst the physical objects of the environment, two of her paintings take on a darker note. “The Voyage” done with acrylics on canvas has inky indigo colour with objects and paint marks to contemplate with the occasional trademark blotch of red hue she places in her art and “Where the cold wind blows and the wild things go”, has rich, deep navy blues with splatterings of paint as if one is looking out a window on a late evening during a storm, the drip marks reminiscent of rain against a glass pane.

There are small paintings done with oil on Fabriano paper that can be clustered in a group for dramatic impact or left as a single strong image, mixed media on Fabriano paper in “A Prelude to Meditation”, acrylic on canvas, “ Second Home by the Sea”, oil on panel, “Some Kind of Nature”, or oil on canvas, “Stylo”. Whatever materials she chooses to employ for the work, all show a high level of skill inherent in the process of paint and the technical use of draftsmanship.
Serena’s studio may well be the familiar strand of sand and sea she explores while walking, her artistic research is the local community that interact with her on those explorations, for as Lippard states in her book about place, “to hope for an art that grows from a deep experience with people and the places where they live” is the great expectation. One might observe that Serena Caulfield is well working her way towards fulfilling that expectation.

Lippard, Lucy, 1997, The Lure of the Local; Senses of Place in a Multicentered Society, Pub: The New York Press.

Susan Edwards, September 2014

Serena’s work can be viewed at The Sweet Shop Gallery,Rosslare Strand, Co. Wexford

www.serenacaulfield.com
www.thesweetshopgallery.com

Screening IFI | Melancholia

Screening IFI | Lars von Trier’s Melancholia
Monday 15 September, 8.30pm, 136 Mins, IFI

In conjunction with the current exhibition Isabel Nolan : The weakened eye of day, IMMA invites you to a special screening at the IFI of Lars von Trier’s film portraying a sibling relationship in the shadow of impending disaster as the planet Melancholia hurtles towards Earth.

As an integral part of Isabel Nolan: The weakened eye of day there will be a series of talks by guests, on subjects ranging from cosmology to philosophy. This film screening, along with a related programme of talks and lectures, are part of the on-going investigative enquiries that inform The weakened eye of day and Nolan’s practice. In the context of Nolan’s exhibition at IMMA, Francis Halsall (Lecturer, MA – Art in Contemporary World, NCAD) will give a short introduction. See further information about the film Melancholia below.

Tickets €5 plus booking fee. Tickets available here

Further Information

Melancholia (2011), 136 minutes| Denmark-Sweden-France-Germany| 2011|Filmed in English| Colour| D-Cinema

How would Lars von Trier follow the eye-popping AntiChrist ? With a chamber drama about bipolar disorder and world destruction but of course. A mesmerising opening salvo delivers Kirsten Dunst iconic in close-up, lashing rain, clashing planets and Wagner’s Tristan and Isolde. Meanings and connections fall into place from then on, as an obviously troubled Dunst attends a plush wedding hosted by her filthy rich family. Charlotte Rampling is a beastly mum, dad John Hurt a charming gadfly, and sibling Charlotte Gainsbourg seemingly the only sensible one. She can’t quite explain away increasingly forlorn Dunst’s aching fears though, not least when a rogue planet approaches on a collision course with Earth. Von Trier conveys to perfection the woozy dislocation experienced by those gripped by the black dog of melancholy, adding strong performances and painterly effects to the mix. As a sufferer himself, it’s an obviously personal project for the great Dane, and quite possibly the most sincere film he’s ever made.

Oiticica : Art and Crisis

NCAD Lecturer and contributor to MA Art in the Contemporary World, Emma Mahony, will take part in the Irish Museum of Modern Art Talks and Lectures programme.

IMMA | TALKS + LECTURES
Lecture | Emma Mahony
Wednesday 10 September, 6.00 – 7.00pm, Lecture Room, IMMA

Emma Mahony (Associate Lecturer, NCAD), will examine how Oiticica’s practice has been inspired by the favelas of Rio de Janeiro, and more widely how the informal city has been perceived by artists and intellectuals (on the left) as a site of resistance where, as curator Carlos Basualdo notes: original forms of socialization, alternative economies and various forms of aesthetic agency are produced (Carlos Basualdo (2003), On the Expression of the Crisis, in Francesco Bonami (ed.), Dreams and Conflicts: The Dictatorship of the Viewer, Venice: Biennale, p. 243).

About Speaker:

Emma Mahony lectures on graduate and undergraduate programmes in the Faculty of Visual Culture at the National College of Art and Design (NCAD), Dublin, where she is also a PhD researcher. She is also a visiting lecturer at the School of Art History and Cultural Policy, University College Dublin (UCD). From 2004 – 8 she was exhibitions curator for the Hayward Gallery, London.

Book your free tickets here



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