Archived entries for In Conversation

TYPECAST X David Booth Exhibition Launch & Artist Talk


TYPECAST x David Booth Exhibition Launch & Artist Talk

Opening 14 June 2019 at 18:00 – 21:00
Runs until 29 June 2019

Artist Talk between Una Sealy RHA and David Booth on Wednesday, 26 June at 18:00
(please RSVP to hello@hangtoughgallery.com)

The Hang Tough Gallery is delighted present Typecast, the first solo show by Dublin based artist David Booth. Booth’s practice deals primarily with painting and drawing, using both traditional acrylic and oil paint on canvas but often incorporating mixed media on unconventional surfaces. Sympathetic to the human form Booth’s attention is largely monopolised toward portraiture. While engaging with a widely traditional format such as is portraiture, it is Booth’s stark contrast between hyper-realistic detailed features and graphic illustrative brush strokes which carry his paintings into the contemporary. Rather than an intention to display the expression or likeness of a human subject, Booth’s subjects are often anonymous; displaying the expression of the artistic gesture.

Occupied by the ongoing study into representation of identity, Typecast is the result of this ongoing theme. While working from his own resources, source imagery is developed in collaboration with contemporary photographers Philip White, Cayne Kxa and Eric van Kampen. Booth uses the portrait as a starting point that usually distills other multidimensional viewpoints. As the concept and vernacular of identity is reorienting, Booth recontextualises the term typecast to challenge these developments and how they refer to social, psychological factors.

David Booth completed his BFA at Wexford Campus School of Art. In 2013 he moved to Dublin to begin his full time career as an artist and has since exhibited both nationally and internationally. Booth has featured in The Irish Times, The Independent and has been awarded the Evans Painting Prize in 2016. His painting ‘Unit’ was selected for the Zurich Portrait Prize 2018/19 at The National Gallery of Ireland. Booth was recently accepted to the BP Portrait Award at the National Portrait Gallery in London. His work is held in both private and public collections including Office of Public Works (O.P.W) and various private collections in Ireland and Europe.

This exhibition is co-curated by ACW alumni and Hang Tough Gallery Assistant Sara Muthi.

Hang Tough Gallery | 25 Lennox St, Portobello, Dublin 8

www.hangtoughgallery.com

FB | IG @hangtoughgallery

a heap of language #002: radical publishing

Please join us for the second instalment of a heap of language, an ongoing event series organised between Paper Visual Art Journal and the School of Visual Culture at NCAD.

For this event we have invited a number of contributors to speak about radical (artists’, small press, activist, and samizdat) publishing.

A publication, compiled by current students of the MA/MFA Art in the Contemporary World, will also be launched. This publication has been collaboratively produced in response to the idea of cohabitation.

Contributors: Christodoulos Makris, Sam Riviere, David Crowley, Simon Cutts and Erica Van Horn, as well as students of the MA/MFA Art in the Contemporary World.

4 pm: transcription writing workshop with Christodoulos Makris [numbers limited, separate sign up]
6 pm: talks at the Goethe-Institut, Merrion Square
8 pm: publication launch at the Goethe-Institut, Merrion Square

This event is kindly funded by the Arts Council of Ireland. All aspects of this event are free but booking is required. Separate registration for the workshop, beginning 4 pm, departing from the Goethe-Institut.

Tickets here.

The Art in the Contemporary World Podcast

We are pleased to announce the launch of The Art in the Contemporary World Podcast, a show about art ideas and some other stuff too. In Episode one, we discuss artist Liam Gillick, the satisfaction of aesthetic disappointment, modesty in the age of capitalism and spectacle, and much more. Listen live at 3pm tomorrow (Sat) at dublindigitalradio.com

Artist Talk: Eszter Szakács

Dates: 20 Feb – 20 Feb
Show Time: 5.30pm – 7pm
Tickets: €0 (Free admission, no booking required)

What the Past Holds for the Future: Socialist Solidarity and the Perspective of a Research Exhibition

A curator’s talk within the framework of Active Archive – Slow Institution, organised in association with CCA Derry~Londonderry.

How can the socialist heritage be recalled today? What are the long-term and global ramifications of ‘regime changes,’ when one ideology is replaced by its opposite? How can the field of contemporary art and the spatiality of a research exhibition allow for a complex analysis of historical materials? The point of departure for the talk is located in the concept and practice of international socialist solidarity, a state-directed policy through which the ‘Second World’ (including Hungary and other Eastern Bloc countries) built official relations with ‘Third World’ countries during the Cold War. More specifically, the talk attempts to outline the context and manifold contradictions of socialist solidarity through the case study of socialist Hungary’s media and knowledge production in relation to the Arab World between 1957 and 1989.

Szakács introduces her research exhibition Propaganda, Mon Amour: Palestine As Seen Through Publications in Socialist Hungary and the most recent thematic issues of the online magazine Mezosfera by tranzit.hu – ‘Refractions of Socialist Solidarity and ‘Propositions for a Pan-Peripheral Network’. In doing so, the talk puts forth the importance of historical awareness and the need to critically engage with the state-directed Cold War policies of international solidarity, especially as these transnational connections are somewhat dismissed in both Hungary and across Eastern Europe today, and remain unknown to a generation that was born after the Cold War.

This presentation by Budapest-based curator, editor and researcher Eszter Szakács will be followed by a conversation with Sara Greavu, independent curator and Head of Public Programmes at CCA Derry~Londonderry.

Bauhaus Effects

A conference organised by the National College of Art and Design, University College Cork, University College Dublin and the Goethe Institut Dublin – 7-9 February 2019

Bauhaus Effects will assemble an interdisciplinary collection of papers that analyse the repercussions of the legendary Bauhaus school in the hundred years since its inception, considering the ways in which the broad range of practices have transformed everyday experiences from the 1920s to the present day.

Bauhaus innovations and models of thought continue to resonate within the contemporary built environment, from chair construction to skyscraper design, from interior spaces to urban topographies, warranting a thorough, methodologically diverse studies of its effects a century after the school was founded.

Bauhaus Effects aims to investigate the continuing impact of the Bauhaus on an impressive range of contemporary practices across the globe. We propose that the Bauhaus was not just a radical art school but in fact initiated a fundamental paradigm shift in design culture whose import is ripe for assessment a century on.

Contributing Institutions:

Goethe Institut Dublin; National College of Ireland; National Gallery of Ireland ; University College Dublin; Dublin City Council; German Embassy; University College Cork

Organising Committee:

Francis Halsall, NCAD; Kathleen James-Chakraborty, UCD; Thomas Lier, Goethe Institut; Sabine Kriebel, UCC; Declan Long, NCAD; Sarah Pierce, NCAD; Heidrun Rottke, Goethe Institut.

Booking Link

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/bauhaus-effects-tickets-54536415888

NB: THE EVENT IS NOW FULLY BOOKED.

Location

National Gallery of Ireland

Merrion Square West

Dublin 2

View Map

Conference Programme

THURSDAY

6pm: Introductions and welcomes by the CONFERENCE TEAM/ AMBASSADOR etc.:

6:30 – 7.30pm. Opening Keynote: Heike Hanada, Bauhaus University, Weimar, Germany, CHAIR: PROF. KATHLEEN JAMES CHAKRABORTY

FRIDAY

10:00am – 12pm. Panel 1: Bauhaus Effects in everyday life CHAIR: LISA GODSON

Andrew McNamara (Queensland University of Technology, Australia): Bauhaus Effects and the contemporary legacy
Mariana Meneses Romero (Nottingham Trent University, UK): Vidal Sassoon and the Bauhaus
Kerry Meaken (Dublin Institute of Technology): The Bauhaus Effect on the Fundamentals of Window Display
Jonathan Foote (Aarhus School of Architecture, Denmark): Toys and the Innocent Eye: Bauhaus Toys of the 1920s

1:00 – 3:00pm. Panel 2: Paradigm Shift CHAIR: Dr SABINE KRIEBEL

Patrick Roessler (Erfurt, Germany) “New typography”, the Bauhaus, and its Impact on Graphic Design
Dietrich Neuman (Brown University, USA) Space-Time and the Bauhaus
Aleksi Lohtaja (University of Jyväskylä, Finland) Bauhaus effects in political economy of Space and Sign
Jan Frohburg (University of Limerick) Bauhaus and Aircrafts
3:30 – 5:15pm. Panel 3: Bauhaus Aftershocks CHAIR: DECLAN LONG

Vanessa Troiano (City University of New York, USA) The “Bauhaus Idea” in Robert Rauschenberg’s Blueprints
Jordan Troeller (Berlin, Germany) Lucia Moholy in Turkey
Ruth Baumeister (Aarhus School of Architecture, Denmark) Bauhaus Effects In and out of Scandinavia
Katarina Elvén (Stockholm, Sweden) Aspects of Doing – The Photographic and Photographed Activity at the Bauhaus

SATURDAY

9:30-11:00am. Panel 4: Bauhaus Effects through pedagogy. CHAIR: FRANCIS HALSALL

Suzanne Strum: Knud Lönberg-Holm and Michigan
Ingrid Mayrhofer Hufnagl: Klee’s pedagogy and computational processing
Philip Glahn: Radical pedagogy of Bauhaus, art as social labor

11:30am – 1:00pm Closing Keynote: Irit Rogoff, Goldsmiths, University of London, UK. CHAIR: DR SARAH PIERCE

Artist In Conversation: Karl Burke and Dr. Francis Halsall

Artist In Conversation: Karl Burke and Dr. Francis Halsall
Thursday 31 January 2019, 6.30pm
Free in.

Artist Karl Burke will be in conversation with Dr. Francis Halsall; art historian and co-director of the MA Art in the Contemporary World at NCAD Dublin. In association with Space Gathers Itself, an exhibition of work by Karl Burke, running until 09 February.
Karl Burke is an Irish artist and musician based in Dublin. He has exhibited widely in Europe and North America including The Royal Hibernian Academy, Irish Museum of Modern Art, Hugh Lane Gallery, Project Arts Centre, The Mac, Maria Stenfors Gallery, The Serpentine and The Mattress factory. A site specific practice of primary concern in Burke’s work is the symbiotic relationship between the art object, the space it inhabits and the experiential concerns related to viewership. The work is often minimal or reductive in appearance and takes the form of sculptural installations often utilising the mediums of steel and wood. Video, sound and the photographic image are utilised in other instances.
Francis Halsall is co-director of Master Programs, Art in the Contemporary World, at National College of Art and Design, Dublin and Research Fellow at the Department of Art History and Image Studies, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa. His research involves three main areas: (1) Modern and Contemporary art; (2) Philosophical aesthetics (3) Systems Thinking. He has published and lectured widely in all areas.

Free event on artists’ writing at Dublin Art Book Fair – Tuesday 27th November

Why do artists write? And do they approach the task of writing differently?

The Art in the Contemporary World MA/ MFA programme at NCAD and Paper Visual Art are hosting an evening of readings at which artists and critics will read their own words, or those of other artists. Speakers include Sue Rainsford, Suzanne Walsh, Fiona Gannon, Jessica Foley, Lily Cahill and others. It will take place on Tuesday 27th November at 6pm in Temple Bar Gallery + Studios, Dublin, as part of the Dublin Art Book Fair 2018.

Free. Open too all. Refreshments served. Please book a place via eventbrite here.

This will be the first of a series of events putting the spotlight on new forms of writing and publishing practices in contemporary art planned for 2018-19.

Liam Gillick in conversation with the MA Art in the Contemporary World


ACW in conversation under Liam Gillick’s Discussion Island at the Return Gallery. Photo by: Louis Haugh

Goethe Institut Irland
37 Merrion Square
Dublin 2

Wednesday
21st November
6PM

On the occasion of Liam Gillick’s exhibition A Depicted Horse is not a Critique of a Horse at the Kerlin Gallery (23rd November – 19th January) and his Denominator Platform 2018, specially commissioned for the Return Gallery at 37 Merrion Square in connection with Common Denominator: Art in the Contemporary World at the Goethe-Institut, a two-year programme that takes as its starting point Walter Gropius’s term, from which collective knowledges progress. Through exhibitions, events, seminars and more we will interrogate and inhabit what it means in our time to speak of political solidarity, civic standards, or even aesthetic values, and to consider the relation between common commitments and necessary possibilities of individual belief, expression and action.

All welcome. Please note space is limited. Arrive early to avoid disappointment.

Supported by the Goethe-Institut Irland, in collaboration with the National College of Art & Design. Courtesy the Kerlin Gallery.

Contacts
Rosa Abbott
Kerlin Gallery
+353 1 670 9093
gallery@kerlin.ie

Éimear Regan
Art in the Contemporary World
ncadacw@gmail.com
www.acw.ie

Heidrun Rottke
Goethe-Institut Irland
+353 1 680 1100
heidrun.rottke@goethe.de

Julia Dubsky | Salon of Good Time, TBG+S Opening

Studio 16 | Temple Bar Gallery + Studios

Opening on Wednesday 23 May, 6-8pm
Continuing to Wednesday 30 May

Opening hours:
11 – 6pm | Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Tuesday, Wednesday
Sunday and Monday by arrangement

Salon Of Good Time is an upcoming show which concludes friend of ACW Julia Dubsky’s year-long Graduate Residency at Temple Bar Gallery + Studios, which has taken place in studio 16.

Over the course of the residency, her work has become bolder in scale and colour, while continuing to question nuances of painting. A personal desire for possibilities beyond impasses has spawned inversions throughout the work – light layers cover dark grounds; dabs are drawn from negative space; receding colours are foregrounded; hot colours cooled and vice versa. Poppyseed oil (which is clear in colour) was used in place of linseed oil for mixing paints, to grant more agency in temperature and tone.

On this occasion, there is an abundance of paintings filling the room. Some lean against the wall, perched on bubblewrap in anticipation of being moved, packed up or turned around. This mode of display consciously suggests a kind of engagement: that of a studio visit. Titles and figurative marks feature more prominently now in narrating the visual language; while varieties of time continue to be recorded in the paintings among layers and marks.

An accompanying text will be written by the TBG+S curator, Rayne Booth.

Julia will give an artist talk as part of the Basic Space talks in Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane, Friday, 18 May, 1pm. The talk will touch on: departing from pathos, jealousy and scarcity, preparations/rehearsals, the grid, narrative through style and titles, paint applications signifying readymades, graffiti, spokes, double negative (representation), smuggling, intrinsic value?, hard edge, Persian calligraphy paintings, penumbra, viridian, red and blue, perception studies … with possible reference to Donna Haraway, Isabelle Graw, Bini Adamczak, Marge Piercy, Djuna Barnes and Clarice Lispector.

Julia Dubsky (b. 1990, Dublin),was awarded the Recent Graduate Residency in Temple Bar Gallery + Studios for one year, beginning in May 2017, after graduating from the National College of Art and Design in 2016, from Fine Art and Visual Culture. Since then, Dubsky has been based in Dublin, London and Berlin. In October 2018, she will join the class of Jutta Koether in Hamburg University of Art.

Image: Julia Dubsky, Baby Sharing, 2018, oil on canvas, 96 x 80 x 2.5cm
More information HERE

The Political and the Public – Talk at the National Gallery of Ireland

Thursday 10th May, 6.00pm, National Gallery of Ireland.

This event discusses Colour is Life through the lens of the politics of art in the public sphere. Drawing from key theorists discussed during the MA seminar, Politics of Participation. The event will take the form of two short introductions on a specific aspect of interest followed by a panel discussion led by the ACW course team.

Organised by GUM collective members Stephen Lau and Sadbh O’Brien, in collaboration with Masters Programs, Art in the Contemporary World at National College of Art and Design, Dublin www.acw.ie

More info at : https://www.nationalgallery.ie/public-and-political

Image and artwork by Sofya Mikhaylova

Austin Hearne – ‘Remains’ opening/ artist talk at Pallas Projects/Studios

Austin Hearne—Remains

Opening reception: 6–8pm Thursday 19th April 2018
Exhibition runs: 12–6pm Thursday 19th – Saturday 28th April
Gallery open: Thursday–Saturday
Artist’s talk: Saturday 28th April 2pm, in conversation with ACW alumni Michelle Hall

Pallas Projects/Studios are pleased to present Austin Hearne—Remains the second exhibition of our Artist-Initiated Projects programme.

“The visual and architectural apparatus of the Church is the embodiment of Catholic doctrine; promulgating the notion that one must submit oneself entirely, body and soul, to be a ‘good’ Catholic. Austin Hearne’s work reflects upon this but also injects a frisson of titillation via an irreverent and occasionally dark celebration of its sensuality.”

—excerpt from Of Lillies and Remains, Pádraic E. Moore

What remains when the other parts have been taken away, consumed, rotted. The Catholic Church is sick, dying, dead, remaining. Its remains stubborn, permanent – can not and will not rot. They are an empty carcass, leftover, ready to be re-inhabited, reanimated by the next wave in its sicker, deadlier form.

Austin Hearne’s practice is rooted in photography wherein he explores its possibilities to produce installations, objects and performances that expand the limits of the photograph and indeed the medium. Prints, furnishings, wallpapers, garments and the materials of the painting and decorating industry all feature, carrying his created imagery and weaved narratives which merge fact and fiction, creating worlds, characters and scenarios that may or may not exist.

Hearne’s research stems from an analysis of the surfaces, iconography and politics of the Catholic Church, with the churches of Dublin and beyond serving as impetus for works in this show. The majesty and misery of this institution’s past and present dwells in the exhibition, with Hearne presenting photographs as interior decor and furniture. One of these pieces entitled Slab, a functional painter and decorator’s wallpaper pasting table acts as a storyboard, holding constructed photographs coalesced with archival documentary photos from the artist’s archive. This amalgamation of photographic work spans two decades posing narratives that the viewer can but glean.

More info at: http://pallasprojects.org/index.php/project/austin-hearneremains

Day-ennial in collaboration with University of Glasgow

This year we’re delighted to welcome MA students from Glasgow University who are visiting on Monday-Wed 26-8th March. The trip is being lead by Dominic Paterson, lecturer in History of Art and curator of Contemporary Art at Glasgow University.

With a day of planned visits to contemporary art galleries in Dublin the itinerary is as follows:

Tuesday 27th, Day-ennial

10.30am – meet at RHA cafe

11am – talk/tour of RHA with Katy Fitzpatrick

12pm – Kerlin Gallery, talk with Rosa Abbott

12.45-1.30 lunch

2.15pm – The LAB, talk with Sheena Barrett

3.30pm – Project Arts Center, talk with Lívia Páldi

4.30pm – Douglas Hyde Gallery

6.30 Liliane Lijn talk at Douglas Hyde

*Subject to change

Anticipation: Actualisation, performance event at the NCAD Gallery


Anticipation: Actualisation
Wednesday 21 March,
Performance 5 – 6 pm,
Panel Discussion 6 – 7 pm

Anticipation: Actualisation is a three part performance art based event happening at the NCAD Gallery, followed by a panel lead discussion curated by ACW student Sara Muthi and Dr. EL Putnam as part of in:Action, the Irish Live Art Review.

This tripartite event is organised by in:Action consisting of Dr. EL Putnam and Sara Muthi at the NCAD Gallery in collaboration with a wide range of artists, scholars and writers specialising in performance practice. This event aims to delve into the complex relationship between the performing body and specific materials, acting as a critique of the body’s dominance in performance art discourse.

Performers include: Paula Fitzsimons, Leann Herlihy , Ciara McKeon, Rachael Rankin
Panelists include: Dr. Hilary Murray , Dr. Sarah Pierce, Nigel Rolfe
Writers include: Jack Beglin, Tara Carroll, Jesse Hopkins, Dr. Francis Halsall

The event is designed as an experiment without a predetermined conclusion though there are three designated outcomes; a one hour live performance by practicing artists, a one hour discussion panel in the Harry Clark Lecture theatre following the live event and three written responses to be published on in:Action (www.inacion.ie) one month later. The inevitable uncertainties that are anticipated to occur between the gaps of the designated outcomes will make up the points of interest for the discussion and writing.
———————————————————————————————————————————-
In:Action
— Irish Live Art Review contains reflections and responses to live art created by Irish and Irish-based artists. Posts are gathered from invited guest writers as well as an ongoing open call. in:Action was developed by Níamh Murphy and EL Putnam, along with Sara Muthi as current editor and contributor. It acts as a site to cultivate discourse and a public platform for practitioners, curators, writers, and aficionados to share ideas about performance art in Ireland.

Dr. EL Putnam is an artist, scholar, and writer that lectures in Art Theory and History at Dublin Institute of Technology. Her performances explore the gestural interplay of the body with digital media. In addition to be the founder of in:Action, recent and upcoming publications include a survey of Irish sound art in Áine Phillips book,Performance Art in Ireland: A History (Intellect Press and Live Art Development Agency, 2015); a paper in the journal Performance Research that investigates national citizenship, performance art, and motherhood in Ireland (2017); and an examination of ageing and the female body through performance art in Ageing Women in Literature and Visual Culture: Reflections, Refractions, Reimaginings (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017).

Sara Muthi is a Dublin based writer & curator. Working primarily within concepts of performance art & its ontological aspects, she studied Fine Art Painting & Visual Culture at the National College of Art & Design. She is currently doing her MA in Art in the Contemporary World at NCAD. In addition to being managing editor forin:Action she had previously assisted in the curation of The Anti-Room (Artbox Gallery, 2015) while recent independent work include an accompanying essay for Homo Ludens (Man At Play) (2018) exhibition for Black Church Print Studios and curating The Public Diary (2018) for First Fortnight Festival 2018.

Notes from the Underground – Art and Alternative Music in Eastern Europe 1968-1989

11:30 am, Monday 12th March, Harry Clarke Lecture Theatre given by Prof. David Crowley (Head of Visual Culture, NCAD)

Reflecting on ideas and artworks in an exhibition which he curated in Łódź last year (and opens again in Berlin this week), in this talk, David will explore the ways in which ‘the underground’ – artists and musicians outside the official zones managed by the communist authorities – embraced abjection, and queered the symbols of state socialism.

All Welcome.

Sam Keogh in conversation with ACW

Sam Keogh opens an exhibition at the Kerlin Gallery titled Kapton Cadaverine this Friday from 6-8 pm.

Keogh the will appear in conversation with ACW at Kerlin Gallery on Thursday 1 February, 5pm. This event is part of a collaboration with NCAD’s Master’s Program MA Art In The Contemporary World.

In Sam Keogh’s Kapton Cadaverine, Kerlin Gallery is transformed into the interior of a dilapidated starship. The ship’s once-white control panels, table and bulkheads are covered in grime. Detritus litters the floor and strange organic forms and collaged images adorn almost every surface. Webs of melted plastic, stuck together with Kapton tape, cocoon the space in a mucosal membrane and the constant white noise of artificial rain underlines the eerie absence of an inhabitant.

More info at: http://www.kerlingallery.com/exhibitions/sam-keogh_1

Gerard Byrne “In Our Time” in Conversation with Declan Long in collaboration with ACW


Gerard Byrne in conversation with Declan Long as part of a MA Art in the Contemporary World collaboration will take place at the Kerlin Gallery, Thursday 7 December, 5pm.

“For his solo exhibition at Kerlin Gallery, Gerard Byrne presents a new video installation, In Our Time. Commissioned for the 2017 edition of Skulptur Projekte Münster, In Our Time depicts the daily activities of an archetypal commercial radio station, provoking questions around the relationship between radio broadcasting, time, pop music and collective memory. The exhibition will open with a reception in the company of the artist on Friday 1 December, 6–8pm.”
Exhibition runs from 2 December 2017 – 20 January 2018

To book this talk please email rosa@kerlin.ie

For more information please visit: http://www.kerlingallery.com/exhibitions/gerard-byrne

IMMA & ACW Fellow Amelia Groom

Public Lecture, by Amelia Groom: Dense and Broken, on rocks, writing and pareidolia.
6pm, Friday November 10th Harry Clarke Lecture Theatre, NCAD, Thomas Street, Dublin.

This Autumn IMMA and NCAD will be joined by Dr Amelia Groom for the 2017 Art in the Contemporary World research and teaching residency. Amelia is an Australian writer based in Amsterdam, where she has taught theory and writing on MA programmes at the Sandberg Instituut since 2014. She completed her PhD in Art History & Theory at the University of Sydney, with a focus on ‘disorderly temporalities’ and the possibilities of anachronism for art historical methodologies. In 2013 she edited the Whitechapel Gallery / The MIT Press ‘Documents of Contemporary Art’ anthology on TIME. For the NCAD / IMMA residency, Amelia will be holding a series of seminars on minerality and embodiment. The seminars will draw from the work of a number of living artists, as well as various historical, mythological and geological phenomena – including Sailing Stones, Medusa, The Vocal Memnon and The Makapansgat Pebble – with the aim of working through questions about extraction, deep time, non-human ecologies, inorganic erotics, pearls, petrifications and other rocky relations.

Amelia will be leading the “Petrified” seminar at NCAD as part of the “Situations” seminar run by ACW:

In everyday language, stones will often stand for ‘inhuman’ emotionlessness – as when we speak of her blank stony stare, the stone cold killer, or somebody with a heart of stone. When something is as solid as a rock it does not break or shift; when it is set in stone, it is fixed and unchangeable. Again and again, rocks come in to language as the antithesis of change, outside of time, without process, stone dead. Beginning from the premise that rocks are not actually atemporal, ahistorical or apolitical, this seminar will be structured around various points of encounter and contamination across the biological and geological realms. Focusing on a range of artistic, literary, theoretical and mythological references, participants will explore questions pertaining to non-human ecologies, queer and feminist neo-materialisms, extraction, ‘deep time’, inorganic erotics, pearls, petrifications and other rocky relations.

More details to come.

RESISTANCE IS FERTILE STEP 1, ‘REFUGE IN FAUXTOPIA’

Location: Auditorium Van Abbe Museum
Time: 14:00 – 17:00
Convened by: Vaari Claffey with Sam Keogh
Presenters: Vaari Claffey, Joseph Noonan-Ganley, Sam Keogh, Dr Tina Kinsella, Our Table – Michelle Darmody Lucky, Seamus Nolan, Grace Weir
Accompanied by Sarah Grimes on drums
With thanks to Culture Ireland

Resistance is Fertile is a multi-platform project which proposes the development of a set of counter-pragmatics for cultural production designed to generate altered modes of operation in situations of emergency or where resistance is required.   It looks to provoke strategies which are not mimetic of currently normalised ‘pragmatics’ but which disrupt, queer, oppose or reconstruct them.

The project proposes and problematizes Ireland as the site of a cultural ‘safe house’ to provide shelter for those practices and practitioners that are threatened by current or impending political or cultural conditions. This forces the necessity for some self-examination on behalf of the hosting country.

This first iteration, ‘Refuge in Fauxtopia’, begins this process by looking at the history of shelter in Ireland as that of a kind of ‘false-friend’.  In linguistics, a ‘false-friend’ is a word or expression that has a similar form to one in a person’s native language, but a different meaning.

https://vanabbemuseum.nl/en/programme/programme/becoming-more-26-may/

HyperNormalisation

Paper Visual Art Journal will host an event at the Douglas Hyde Gallery, Dublin, to discuss some elements of the recent work by British filmmaker Adam Curtis, particularly his 2016 essay-film Hypernormalisation. We have invited Alice Butler of the Irish Film Institute, Francis Halsall of the National College of Art and Design, Dublin, and independent filmmaker Tadhg O’Sullivan (The Great Wall) to contribute to this discussion. The major focus of the talk will be the content and form of Curtis’s argumentation in this film and how this form of argumentation has evolved from earlier works.

This event has been kindly supported by the Arts Council.

Eventbrite link here.

An audio recording of the conversation will be made available on the PVA website subsequently.

Áine Mc Bride, Habitat HQ


ÁINE MC BRIDE, Habitat HQ
Monday, March 13 – Friday, March 24, 2017

This off-site project will take place in the concourse surrounding the Edmund Burke Theatre on the lower floor of the Arts Building, Trinity College. Subtly responding to the materials, forms, motifs, and imagery in this active thoroughfare, Áine Mc Bride has produced a new body of sculptures that will temporarily inhabit this space.

While the brutalist architecture of this institutional environment can be stark and unstimulating, it is each day enlivened by the students and visitors who find space here to eat, relax, and study. The group of works that will furnish the concourse refer to the functionality of the surroundings but are formally reduced to a point where it is clear that they cannot serve a practical purpose. Partly a pragmatic decision, made in light of the objects being located in a busy public area, it also circumvents any potential for the pieces to be regarded as ornamentation, obscuring their role as either sculptures or utilitarian objects. This ambiguity emphasises how the nature, or an idea, of a place can be hard to define or rationalise when its intended function is displaced by how it is used.

Artist’s Talk

At 6pm on Friday, March 24, Áine Mc Bride will talk to Francis Halsall about the ideas and research interests that helped to form the work in this project. The talk will take place in the concourse area where the sculptures are located.

Please visit the Gallery for details of how to access the off-site exhibition. The Douglas Hyde Gallery and the Arts Building will be closed on Friday, March 17, and Sunday, March 19. This project has been supported by the Trinity College Visual and Performing Arts Fund.



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