Archived entries for Events

Make Haste, Slowly at the Return Gallery


Photo Credit: Louis Haugh

Make Haste, Slowly
Return Gallery Goethe-Institut Irland, 37 Merrion Square, Dublin 2.

A collectively curated, scripted, performed, and presented exercise in radical pedagogies by the MA Art in the Contemporary World: Jack Cole, Dominique Crowley, Padraig Cunningham, Stephanie Deady, María del Buey, Tamara Derksen, Nicole Di Sandro, Brendan Fox,
Kate Friedeberg, Valerie Joyce, Seánan Kerr, Heidee Martin, Grainne Murphy, Orlaith Phelan, Natalie Pullen, Éimear Regan, and Laura Skublics.
With artworks and collaborations featuring Basil Al
Rawi, Jane’s Bees, Jasmin Marker, Repeater Collective, Noel Sheridan, John Smith, and David and Sally Shaw-Smith. Presented in the context of Liam Gillick’s Denominator Platform 2018, specially commissioned by Art in the Contemporary World for the Return Gallery.
Make Haste, Slowly is part of Common Denominator: Art in the Contemporary World at the Goethe-Institut, a two-year programme that takes as its starting point Walter Gropius’s term, from which collective knowledges progress. Through exhibitions, events, seminars and more we will interrogate and inhabit what it means in our time to speak of political solidarity, civic standards, or even aesthetic values, and to consider
the relation between common commitments and necessary possibilities of individual belief, expression and action.
Art in the Contemporary World is Ireland’s leading taught MA at the National College of Art & Design in Dublin.
Our students are avid researchers whose focus is to advance a project with the aim of understanding, interrogating,
and expanding the role of contemporary practices and their contexts. ACW is led by Francis Halsall, Declan Long and Sarah Pierce.
Supported by the Goethe-Institut Irland in collaboration with the National College of Art & Design. Special thanks to the Kerlin Gallery and IMMA | Irish Museum of Modern Art.


Opening
30th November 2018 6 – 9pm
Exhibition runs through 12th January 2019
.

Liam Gillick in conversation with the MA Art in the Contemporary World


ACW in conversation under Liam Gillick’s Discussion Island at the Return Gallery. Photo by: Louis Haugh

Goethe Institut Irland
37 Merrion Square
Dublin 2

Wednesday
21st November
6PM

On the occasion of Liam Gillick’s exhibition A Depicted Horse is not a Critique of a Horse at the Kerlin Gallery (23rd November – 19th January) and his Denominator Platform 2018, specially commissioned for the Return Gallery at 37 Merrion Square in connection with Common Denominator: Art in the Contemporary World at the Goethe-Institut, a two-year programme that takes as its starting point Walter Gropius’s term, from which collective knowledges progress. Through exhibitions, events, seminars and more we will interrogate and inhabit what it means in our time to speak of political solidarity, civic standards, or even aesthetic values, and to consider the relation between common commitments and necessary possibilities of individual belief, expression and action.

All welcome. Please note space is limited. Arrive early to avoid disappointment.

Supported by the Goethe-Institut Irland, in collaboration with the National College of Art & Design. Courtesy the Kerlin Gallery.

Contacts
Rosa Abbott
Kerlin Gallery
+353 1 670 9093
gallery@kerlin.ie

Éimear Regan
Art in the Contemporary World
ncadacw@gmail.com
www.acw.ie

Heidrun Rottke
Goethe-Institut Irland
+353 1 680 1100
heidrun.rottke@goethe.de

Review by Seanán Kerr, ACW: Sean Scully, The Land/The Line at The Kerlin Gallery

Landline Burgandy, Sean Scully. Photo by Seanán Kerr

The Land/The Line, Sean Scully

The Kerlin Gallery

3rd October-17th November

“People come in here wanting to hate them…” To turn a trite cliché if Sean Scully didn’t exist you’d have to invent him, but such is the particular idiosyncrasies of that aspect (or perception) of Ireland he captures, there is perhaps only space in the collective art consciousness for one. What the gallerist informed me cannot be said for certain to be a wholly accurate gauge of the mind state of those before encountering one of the large square Scullies from 2015 and 2017 (curiously not 2016) of the landline series. As ever the space of the Kerlin excels in displaying work of this kind of scale, big, but not excessively so, a generously portioned meal for an obese Goldilocks, the size and lighting of the space suits these creatures. Yet what the gallerist said certainly indicates there is an expectation, that they are too easy, a little too technical bereft, or perhaps rather a little too close to the bone as regards precisely what it is they speak of.

The seven works are the same size, approximately the same form, though two are canvas and five are aluminium, the ‘lines’ of the show title are there and they are not. This use of line as a denominator is surely at least partially ironic, at very few points are the delineations between the horizontalised colour forms these paintings consist of so clean as to honestly be called “line” with a straight face, there is a minimum of three dimensions at play here. They smack and trample, into and over, akin to the colours in a four year old’s ball of play dough, once pristine, now mangled and bet into each other. Which isn’t to say they aren’t clearly defined, but sometimes the so-called lines aren’t defined by themselves inasmuch as they are by the last vestiges of older lines peeping out, like disturbed graves on a building site.

But what of the uncomfortable truth in Scully’s work? TJ Clark once defended the abstract expressionists citing “vulgarity”, is there a similar defense to be mounted in Scully’s case? Perhaps, perhaps not, in selecting the term “vulgar” Clark chose a word perfectly suited to a political, economic and cultural superpower on the rise, different to Ireland. Were I to propose such a term for Scully in the context of Éire it would have to be one that holds to an equivalent essential truth about both; that word would have to be “adequate”.

Like “vulgar” it conjures a sense of the pejorative, but not necessary so. The etymological root is in the latin for “equal”, the modern sense means “just good enough”. Both meanings speak of a certain truth of Irishness, where the light under overcast skies is spread wide, thin, nothing pops in such light, photographers complain of it, the lines are not quite lines.

The paintings follow a clockwise pattern, you climb the stairs and start with the one on its own on the left. This one is clearly the first in the sequence, there is a sense of signature about it, if you had to chose one to speak for the remaining half dozen, this would be it. The mix of blues is emblematic of the selection of works here, the inside of an old pot left outdoors rust orange, the burgundy that gives the work it’s title (Landline Burgundy), the sticking plaster fleshy-beige that streaks across the middle…

The presence of aluminium and canvas-based paintings begs a question, encourages examination of the brush strokes for stories and meaning. The aluminium resists, the canvas gives; so I’m told. (Though one risks making a fool of oneself if you can’t pass the pepsi challenge without peeking round the sides to note the material). The two blues speak of dark sea, yet the blue at the bottom is almost comically so, a mutant stowaway, a child’s idea of what blue is, unnatural and yet a shade often found on school uniforms. No single “line” is uniform. As with how the margins bleed and bump, fight and jostle, so too within the strokes themselves there is disagreement, different colours cling to different bristles, nothing is clearly defined and yet it is. There are seven “lines” (Newton who gave us two purple-blues (because the number seven appealed to his occultist sensibilities) would be pleased), the burgundy is second from bottom, it is complimented by the sticking plaster beige by looking like something you’d find under a bandage.

It is difficult sometimes to separate those aspects of Irishness that are in and of themselves, “pure” so to speak and those which emerged as a technology to be used against the English. An example can be found in a scene from Paddy Breathnacht’s I Went Down, where three men in a car approach a Garda checkpoint, the two in the front are kidnapping the one in the back, the kidnappers frantically curse the presence of the Gardaí on the road ahead as they pull up towards them, but as soon as they do pull up and the Garda looms through the wound down window, Brendan Gleeson’s Bunny draws the biggest laugh of the film by making this face…

There is something sinister about “Céad Míle Fáilte”, the term “aggressive gift giving” springs to mind, to be welcomed a hundred thousand times would be beyond tolerable.

The paint is slapped and lathered, the root of the strokes, as much in elbow, shoulder, torso, as wrist. A lick of not quite painted-over brown between beige and navy blue, another of the aforementioned disturbed graves.

The second Landline Asure, promises something more tranquil, this paint is borne by canvas, the surface less brutalised, shorter strokes, more delicate, curvier. A thick, almost slime-like spearmint green dominates the middle, an unfamiliar brand of toothpaste, one blue is so navy-dark it is as though the paint itself is hiding the strokes out of shame. There is no flatness here either, not really.

The third is brother to the first, perhaps twin. A broader spectrum. The longer, raking, straighter strokes the aluminium provokes, return. Again sea and rust, but a darker rust-red, situated on top, like a burning sky. A green is murdered and buried under granny-tights beige, can something that doesn’t aim for perfection have imperfections? A stab of white along the side, elderly pubic hair to go with the tights. Along the bottom is a dirty mustard, you’d think it had been dipped in it, if it wasn’t for the strokes.

The state of mind these images most readily reveal their nature to is sleep deprived. Jordowsky stayed awake for a week in the company of a zen master before shooting Holy Mountain. Camera pull back. Extreme heat and extreme cold are indistinguishable to touch. Place your arm along a series of bars which alternate cold and warm it will trick your system into registering extreme heat; apparently. The fourth is shaded like a child hiding in a ditch, or maybe she’s just thinking or longingly for the recent past to escape the near future as she rides in the back of the car being driven officiously back to the home she’d fled. This is what comes to mind when I look at Landline Crimson.

The lines have personality. The one painting called untitled has an expanse of grey, halfway between a view and being intensely accosted by John Major’s Spitting Image puppet. What does Scully have against canvases? Michelangelo struck David with his hammer demanding it speak, after it was finished, Scully attacks his canvases from the get go screaming, “shut up”.

The sixth is almost behaving itself, “yes Garda, as you can see…” the lines are almost evenly spaced. Here at last we have some green, but a green no Board Fáilte brochure would dare make use of. This is the green of Holbein’s dead Christ that so disturbed Dostoyevsky’s Prince Myshkin, not dying, not resurrected, but dead. This was the painting that on my first visit attracted flies, the gallerist approached me when he saw me taking photographs of them up close, we’d been in college about the same time, he a year below me (I think), but older, American, “please don’t post those online”, of course. Like a fascinating wound, the seat of all your attention, itchy, sore, pustulant, begging to be popped, prodded, picked, more engrossing than a smartphone in a hospital waiting room.

It is a treat to spend so much time with them, or at least to have a reason to, they require time. Footsteps and mouse clicks, short overheard conversations. The owner asking about the affordability of water taxis in some city he has to meet an artist, the gallerist answering a phone, saying matter of factly “about 11”. It seems everyone in here has a cold, sporadic coughing abounds, including from myself. I take it back, this one is the most obedient yet. Strokes shorter, more numerous, smoother, more bet in.

All is lit superbly. I am done, but never done with you Ireland, emigrant writers who can’t stop writing about here, you know the type, suppose you get it in painters too. Dignity in smeared makeup, like the drunk who feels sobered up in the company of the far drunker companion she’s waiting patiently with in the station at four in the morning. A strange blue-pink, the colour of a newborn chick tossed from a nest, an umbilical cord or varicose veins.

They are not lines,
They are not land,
They are people.

Seanán Kerr

Seanán Kerr was born in 1980, some stuff happened, then he wrote this. He is currently studying for an MA with Art in the Contemporary World, NCAD

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Memento Aldi, Danny Kelly at deAppendix

Memento Aldi, Danny Kelly at deAppendix, 30 Ardagh Grove, Blackrock.

Run: 23rd Oct – 7th Dec 2018

Memento Aldi is an installation of Danny Kelly’s recent painting at DeAppendix. Kelly’s work elaborates a subjective sphere of heterogeneous features comprising tropes of painting culture and items of biographical significance. A protean topography traverses the work’s pictorial content, objective environmental and material properties, and interpreted public and personal cultures – intimations of chart music and domestic miscellanea. Dynamics of disintegration and consolidation alternate, suggesting an accidental crucible breeding ephemeral hybrids. A visceral, crudely drawn practice emerges – playing with cohesiveness, personal identity and public visuality – and is embraced as a pidgin chart music.

Further info : contactdeappendix@gmail.com / 012785866

deAppendix is a cultural space co-located with a GP surgery and hosts a calendar of contemporary art exhibitions and artists talks. Through it’s programme deAppendix challenges how such spaces are activated and in so doing questions accepted norms for this genre of space. deAppendix is a project by Ciara McMahon whose art practice frequently examines the potential for hybridity between the disciplines of Art and Medicine. For further information see: www.deappendix.wordpress.com, or find us on Facebook, or we can be contacted at contactdeappendix@gmail.com

Island Life, group show featuring Stephanie Deady, ACW

Island Life – Westport

25TH October – 25th November 2018

Custom House Studios & Gallery

Westport Quay

Co.Mayo

A conversation with some of the artists will be held on Thursday the 25th October at 5.30pm.

Sonia Shiel, Nevan Lahart, Sinéad Ní Mhaonaigh, Kathy Tynan, Aileen Murphy, Marcel Vidal, Stephanie Deady, Stephen Loughman, Lesley-Ann O’Connell, Cecilia Danell, William O’Neill, Pat Byrne, Salvatore of Lucan, Robert Armstrong, Mark Swords, Dermot Seymour, Julia Dubsky and Joe Scullion.

Island Life will have it’s second outing later this month in Custom House Studios Gallery, Westport. The exhibition will include some new works by previously exhibited artists as well as the addition of Nevan Lahart, Aileen Murphy, Dermot Seymour, and Sinéad Ní Mhaonaigh.

Painting exists in an increasingly sophisticated visual world that sometimes seems to have a diminishing interest in the possibilities of paint. Island Life is concerned with the idea that, within the medium of paint there are opportunities for the individual to question the situation we live in and the resources we share. The paintings in this exhibition address the human condition and each of the artists suggests the capacity of the medium of paint to encompass both personal and universal concerns.

IRISH FILM “Memory Room” TO PREMIERE IN PARADOCS SECTION OF IDFA 2018

A new short film by Adrian Duncan and Feargal Ward will have its world premiere
next month at the prestigious IDFA (International Documentary Festival Amsterdam).
Memory Room (2018, 17 mins, Arts Council) was shot in the Arctic Circle and
retraces the steps of an Irish forester sent to Finland in 1946 to secure poles for the
rural electrification project being undertaken back home. The film has been selected
for the Paradocs section of IDFA 2018 – a programme that showcases what is
happening beyond the frame of traditional documentary filmmaking, on the borders
between film and art, truth and fiction, and narrative and design.
The film was written and directed by Adrian Duncan (Bungaló Bliss) and Feargal
Ward (Yximalloo, The Lonely Battle Of Thomas Reid). Actor, Barry Ward (Jimmy’s
Hall, Britannia, Save Me, Maze) was cast in the role of the forester. The film was
photographed by Feargal Ward and Jonathan Sammon, with the score created by
Declan Synnott. The film was funded in 2016 by the Arts Council as part of their
Project Award strand. A version of the film and accompanying sculptural installation,
which was titled The Soil Became Scandinavian, was selected for Ireland’s biennial,
EVA International 2018 – curated by Inti Guerrero.
Co-directors, Duncan and Ward say, “It’s great to have the opportunity to bring this
type of film to IDFA. Our film exists at the outer fringes of what might be called the
‘traditional documentary form’, which is of course an area we are very excited to
work in. Making unconventional works that challenge the medium are incredibly hard
to get funded. We can’t thank the Arts Council enough for making this possible – we
are indebted to them for giving us the freedom and confidence to make this happen.”
Trailer here:
https://vimeo.com/292075357

Contact:
Adrian Duncan – +49 152 02767503 – a@adrianduncan.eu
Feargal Ward – +353 86 3313690 – feargal@fsefilms.com

In + Around | Deirdre Ni Argain and Natalie Pullen at In-spire Gallery, Dublin 1


September 27, 2018
Inspire gallery
56 Gardiner Street Lower – Dublin 1

Siuan Ni Dhochartaigh curates the artwork made by her mother, Deirdre Ni Argain, during and after pregnancy. Their mother-daughter collaboration is shown in and around ‘The Five’, a series of paintings by Natalie Pullen delving into feminine mysticism and the Occult.

Bringing their diverse practices together has started a conversation about their personal and professional relationships as artists and women. Through the programme of daily events they hope to open this conversation up and re-activate the work on show through viewer participation.

Join us at the opening reception, 6pm Thursday 27th September.
On Friday there will be a curators tour and talk at 1.15pm and 6.30pm. On Saturday 5pm, Natalie Pullen will host an automatic drawing workshop and on Sunday there will be a full day workshop led by art therapist Deirdre Ni Argain. Reading circles and live readings will happen throughout the week. Find more information and the full schedule through Facebook and on Instagram @inand_around. Please get in touch at 287gallery@gmail.com for any enquiries and booking.

Date/Time: 27/09/2018 – 04/10/2018

Email
nataliepullen123@gmail.com

Launch of Paper Visual Art: Vol 9

Launch of Paper Visual Art: Vol 9 will open at Temple Bar Gallery and Studios in the atrium space on Thursday the 20th Sep from 7 pm. All welcome

HEAVY WEATHER – opening 29th August 2018

HEAVY WEATHER’s origin is a reading group convened in September 2017 by artist Emma McKeagney and including ACW Alumni Ciara McMahon and Danny Kelly, to consider New Materialism in its implications for art practices. Generous explorations of materiality as an enigmatic potential, reworking of human relations with entities and agencies, and spectres of environmental collapse, have intrinsically or tangentially informed the practices – and affect the artists – collected here. Deriving from the 1977 album by fusion group Weather Report, HEAVY WEATHER is a provisional encounter of disparates, forced by contemporary exigencies. It is a settled but uncertain address, a dose of talk about the weather. Featured artists: Louisa Casas; Ann Ensor; Adam Goodman; Milica Jovanovic; Danny Kelly (ACW Alumni); Emma McKeagney; Ciara McMahon (ACW Alumni); Cliodhna O’Riordan.

Opening at the Complex,( https://www.thecomplex.ie/ ) Little Green Street, 6-8pm 29th August, 2018

Open daily 11 – 6pm, 30th August – 3rd September 2018

https://www.facebook.com/events/291026194819137/

BAUHAUS EFFECTS: A conference in Dublin, organised by NCAD, UCC, UCD and the Goethe Institut Dublin

BAUHAUS EFFECTS: A conference in Dublin, organised by the National College of Art and Design, University College Cork, University College Dublin and the Goethe Institut Dublin

7-9 February 2019

More details: https://bauhauseffects.com

Keynote speakers include:

Prof. Heike Hanada, the architect of the Bauhaus Museum currently under construction in Weimar

Prof. Irit Rogoff, one of the initiators of the transdisciplinary field of Visual Culture and founder of the department at Goldsmiths, University of London.


Call for Papers

As the centenary of the founding of the Bauhaus approaches, we seek contributors to reflect on the legacy and resonances of the innovative artistic, architectural, design and teaching practices developed there.

Bauhaus Effects aims to assemble an interdisciplinary collection of papers that analyse the repercussions of the legendary Bauhaus school in the hundred years since its inception, considering the ways in which the broad range of practices — including material analysis, models of pedagogy, textile and wallpaper composition, theatre staging and costume design, photography, and interior systems – have transformed everyday experiences from the 1920s to the present day.

Bauhaus innovations and models of thought continue to resonate within the contemporary built environment, from chair construction to skyscraper design, from interior spaces to urban topographies, warranting a thorough, methodologically diverse studies of its effects a century after the school was founded.

Bauhaus Effects aims to investigate the continuing impact of the Bauhaus on an impressive range of contemporary practices across the globe. We propose that the Bauhaus was not just a radical art school but in fact initiated a fundamental paradigm shift in design culture whose import is ripe for assessment a century on.

We welcome papers from a wide range of perspectives, including urbanism, city and regional planning, architecture, drama and theatre studies, art school pedagogy, photo history, art history, contemporary art practice and theory, design history, corporate design and diaspora/exile studies.

Bauhaus Effects and Contemporary Art

We especially welcome proposals for contributions that relate to the practice and discourse of contemporary art. Given that this will be one of many conferences happening across the EU for the 100 year anniversary of the Bauhaus – for this particular contribution to the conference we feel at liberty to bypass those hegemonic legacies of the Bauhaus that might lead to historical or nationalist claims being celebrated without being problematized.

Hence, the contribution to the conference from the School of Visual Culture will be a strand in the programme that will consider the legacies of the Bauhaus in the context of contemporary art. We will interrogate alternative geographies and ways of working, thinking more about inhabitations of discipline and “school” such as the artist-teacher, radical pedagogies, student bodies, and so on.

Please submit a 300-word abstract and a 50 word biography by 1 July 2018 to:

Kathleen James-Chakraborty: Kathleen.jameschakraborty@ucd.ie

Francis Halsall: halsallf@staff.ncad.ie

Sabine Kriebel: s.kriebel@ucc.ie

Artist Talks | Steve McCullagh and Simon Mills

June 29 – June 30

Jun 29 at 4:30 PM to Jun 30 at 7 PM

Platform Arts Belfast
1 Queen Street, BT1 6 Belfast

Platform invites you to join us for an afternoon of discussion with the artists’ of our current exhibition and guest speakers.

Starting at 4.30pm

”Chaâba Valley, Safi Morocco.
Safi is famed for its ceramic production and over 100 workshops and kilns were built in the valley. Despite practicing in this environment for several generations the community has now been relocated to a new studio complex in another part of the city.”

Artist Simon Mills will host a discussion on his photographic work and installation in relation to the process of documenting not only the physical landscape of ‘the valley’ but the cultural, economic and political landscape of the region itself.

Simon Mills is a Belfast based documentary photographer. As well as exploring making processes and communities, his work also examines land use and our changing relationship with the landscape.

*Interlude with refreshments and discussion*

Starting 6pm

”Life on land is a multi format exhibition comprising of a series of large photographic prints and a sculptural installation of living mudskipper fish. The prints miscommunicate their subject: the sea. Wave ripples and singular reflections of light are obscured, as if the body of water is distilled down to its prototypical component. McCullagh’s artworks address the phenomenology of space and the subjectivity of perception studied through the photographic medium. Highlighting perceptual manipulation the works question the way we perceive things through direct interaction, expanding analysis and given contexts.

Presented by Platform Arts artist Steve McCullagh will discuss the development of his current Exhibition Life On Land with Dr. Francis Halsall, writer and Co-Director of the MA Art in the Contemporary World at The National Collage of Art Dublin and Dr. Ruby Wallis Artist and MFA Lecturer at Burren College of Art, Galway.”

Curating in the 21 st Century: Summer School with Morgan Quaintance

Applications are open / Deadline is June 25.

10-13 July, 2018

In addition to the curator’s traditional duties of administration, artist liaison, exhibition design, and fundraising, what other tools can be used to fulfill the essential curatorial function of presenting, interpreting, and disseminating contemporary art and ideas for a given public? This year’s Summer School, led by Morgan Quaintance – including key invited speakers, such as The White Pube (Gabrielle de la Puente and Zarina Muhammad) – will consider the possibilities offered by filmmaking, broadcasting and criticism. With an emphasis on the transference of practical skills and theoretical knowledge, this summer school is also aimed at artists and other cultural producers as participants will be given a basic introduction to each field designed to encourage further exploration beyond the course.

Morgan Quaintance is a London-based writer, musician, broadcaster and curator. Born in South London, he is a regular contributor to Art Monthly, and has written for The Guardian, The Wire, Art Review, Frieze, Rhizome.org, and a number of curatorial sites and blogs. He is a contributing editor for E-Flux’s online publishing portal Art Agenda, is a founding member of the curatorial collective DAM PROJECTS, and was the 2015/16 curatorial fellow at Cubitt Gallery, London. As a presenter he has worked with BBC radio and television, Channel Four, Artfund, the Royal Opera House, National Theatre and Roundhouse, and is also the producer of Studio Visit, a monthly hour-long interviews-based programme, broadcast on Resonance 104.4 FM, featuring international contemporary artists as guests.

Course requirements
Participants should come with something they would like to curate (i.e. formally present, interpret and disseminate to a given public). It can be anything from an idea, socio-cultural or political issue, to a survey of artists or an artistic tendency. What is important is that each participant will have something to test out in the filmmaking, broadcasting and criticism sessions.

Application procedure
This programme is open to curators and artists.
Selection will be based on submission of a curatorial /artist statement, a short bio, an up to date CV and 4-5 images where appropriate.
Please note this four day course has a limit on places and is competitive.

Cost – €200

For more information, please contact Jennie Guy at projects@firestation.ie

Fire Station Artists’ Studios
9-12 Lower Buckingham Street
Dublin 1
+353(1)8069010
artadmin@firestation.ie
www.firestation.ie

NCAD GRADUATE EXHIBITION 2018

NCAD GRADUATE EXHIBITION 2018

Students graduating from the National College of Art and Design this year will exhibit their work at the College’s annual Graduate Exhibition, which will run from Saturday, 9th June until Sunday, 17th June.

The NCAD 2018 Exhibition features the work of graduates from across NCAD’s four Schools of Fine Art, Design, Education and Visual Culture, together with postgraduates from the MFA in Fine Art, MFA in Digital Art and MFA Design programmes. In addition, a selection of work in progress is on display by postgraduates in Design.

The exhibition presents an opportunity for the leading artists and designers of the future to showcase their creative abilities as they launch their professional careers. It’s also an opportunity for potential collectors, employers and innovators to spot the latest talent, and for curious members of the public to see the newest trends in design and art.

EXHIBITION LOCATIONS:

NCAD Thomas Street Campus, 100 Thomas Street, Dublin 8:
Communication Design; Fashion Design; Jewellery & Objects; Textile & Surface Design; Product Design; MA Interaction Design; MSc Medical Device Design; MFA Design; Applied Materials; Media; Painting; Print; Sculpture & Expanded Practice. The BA Joint Honours in Fine Art or Design & Education students will be exhibiting alongside their studio classmates.

The Annex, 101-103 James’ Street, Dublin 8:
MFA in Digital Art; MFA in Fine Art

————————————————————————

EXHIBITION OPENING TIMES:
Saturday 9th – Sunday 17th June 2016
Weekdays: 10am – 8pm
Weekends: 12pm – 5pm

ADMISSION FREE

More information at www.ncad.ie

BASIC TALKS ~ The White Pube

Friday, June 8 at 1 PM – 2 PM

The White Pube is the collaborative identity of Gabrielle de la Puente and Zarina Muhammad under which they write criticism and sometimes curate. It is based at thewhitepube.com and on Instagram and Twitter as @thewhitepube. The duo publish a new text every Sunday in the form of exhibition reviews and occasionally baby essays or podcasts, working from their respective cities of London and Liverpool.

BASIC TALKS is a series of talks with leading contemporary practitioners, taking place at The Hugh Lane on the second Friday of every month. Curated by Basic Space in partnership with The Hugh Lane, BASIC TALKS is a platform for lectures, workshops, presentations, and performances. Speakers will include artists, curators, writers, and critics who will generate discourse on producing, framing and exhibiting art. BASIC TALKS is a collaboration between Basic Space and The Hugh Lane, exploring alternatives in the dissemination of contemporary art and its discourses.

Admission is free but spaces are limited to 50 so please arrive promptly to avoid disappointment.

Basic Talks ~ The White Pube is part of a multi-site programme of exhibitions, residencies and public programmes looking at institutional attitudes, community spaces and education.

‘The Landis Museum’ opening at CCA Derry

CCA is pleased to invite you to the opening of The Landis Museum.

Bianca Baldi, Irina Gheorghe, Helena Hamilton, Dorothy Hunter (ACW student), Alex Impey, Kapwani Kiwanga, Nina Liebenberg, Phillip McCrilly, Sarah Pierce (ACW coordinator), Katrina Sheena Smyth, Alexandra Sukhareva. Devised by James N. Hutchinson and Chapter Thirteen.

‘The Landis Museum’ is a museum of encounter. It is based on the methodology of Mark Landis, a man who – in late 2010 – became the subject of a number of international newspaper articles that characterised him as an art-world fraud; a forger who had been fooling museums by donating fake paintings and drawings for nearly twenty-five years. But such a characterisation is only one aspect of what was at play in Landis’ activities, and it may obscure what makes his work useful and interesting. For Landis, the motivation appears to have been as much about the interaction with the institution as it was about his work’s inclusion in museum collections. ‘The Landis Museum’ is a site for exploring the legacies of – or traces left by – moments of encounter, or generating central points through which new moments of encounter can be enacted.

The museum is displayed in a sculptural structure, designed specifically to house the objects, texts and videos. It brings together seven international artists, gathered because they share something in their mode of operation, their starting points, or the manner in which they seek to be read.

Devised by James N. Hutchinson, ‘The Landis Museum’ was initially shown at Chapter Thirteen as part of Glasgow International, 2018. CCA is presenting a new iteration of the project, adding a local annex to the museum.

The local annex consists of a series of one-day residencies that respond to the travelling exhibition. The residencies are choreographed encounters between the existing works and four artists based in Northern Ireland. The artists in residence are invited to use the gallery as their studio and to stage a ‘public moment’ that may be, for instance, a lecture, performance, meal, or workshop. Please check our website for details of upcoming events.

Opening Events

6:30 pm – Talk: James N. Hutchinson will talk about the time he spent with Mark Landis in the weeks following his exposure in the press, and will offer the opportunity to see and handle a number of objects made by Landis that do not appear in the exhibition.

7:00 pm – Exhibition opening

8:00 pm – Performance: ‘Foreign Language for Beginners’ (2015 – ongoing) is a performance work by Irina Gheorghe that explores the dynamics and history of a potential first contact through speech, sound and movement. It is a conversation with the world outside the word, by way of word, inside a room. The performance starts with simple messages that were composed and gathered by the SETI Institute to be sent into outer space. As the performance progresses, the mode of address, the language and the situation become increasingly uncanny.

The opening is a free event and refreshments will be provided.

This exhibition and associated events are made possible through the generous support of the Arts Council of Northern Ireland and with the further support of Culture Ireland and Glasgow International.

More info: http://cca-derry-londonderry.org/exhibitions/the-landis-museum/

Image credit: Kapwani Kiwanga, ‘The Secretary’s Suite’, 2016, video still

Julia Dubsky | Salon of Good Time, TBG+S Opening

Studio 16 | Temple Bar Gallery + Studios

Opening on Wednesday 23 May, 6-8pm
Continuing to Wednesday 30 May

Opening hours:
11 – 6pm | Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Tuesday, Wednesday
Sunday and Monday by arrangement

Salon Of Good Time is an upcoming show which concludes friend of ACW Julia Dubsky’s year-long Graduate Residency at Temple Bar Gallery + Studios, which has taken place in studio 16.

Over the course of the residency, her work has become bolder in scale and colour, while continuing to question nuances of painting. A personal desire for possibilities beyond impasses has spawned inversions throughout the work – light layers cover dark grounds; dabs are drawn from negative space; receding colours are foregrounded; hot colours cooled and vice versa. Poppyseed oil (which is clear in colour) was used in place of linseed oil for mixing paints, to grant more agency in temperature and tone.

On this occasion, there is an abundance of paintings filling the room. Some lean against the wall, perched on bubblewrap in anticipation of being moved, packed up or turned around. This mode of display consciously suggests a kind of engagement: that of a studio visit. Titles and figurative marks feature more prominently now in narrating the visual language; while varieties of time continue to be recorded in the paintings among layers and marks.

An accompanying text will be written by the TBG+S curator, Rayne Booth.

Julia will give an artist talk as part of the Basic Space talks in Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane, Friday, 18 May, 1pm. The talk will touch on: departing from pathos, jealousy and scarcity, preparations/rehearsals, the grid, narrative through style and titles, paint applications signifying readymades, graffiti, spokes, double negative (representation), smuggling, intrinsic value?, hard edge, Persian calligraphy paintings, penumbra, viridian, red and blue, perception studies … with possible reference to Donna Haraway, Isabelle Graw, Bini Adamczak, Marge Piercy, Djuna Barnes and Clarice Lispector.

Julia Dubsky (b. 1990, Dublin),was awarded the Recent Graduate Residency in Temple Bar Gallery + Studios for one year, beginning in May 2017, after graduating from the National College of Art and Design in 2016, from Fine Art and Visual Culture. Since then, Dubsky has been based in Dublin, London and Berlin. In October 2018, she will join the class of Jutta Koether in Hamburg University of Art.

Image: Julia Dubsky, Baby Sharing, 2018, oil on canvas, 96 x 80 x 2.5cm
More information HERE

The Political and the Public – Talk at the National Gallery of Ireland

Thursday 10th May, 6.00pm, National Gallery of Ireland.

This event discusses Colour is Life through the lens of the politics of art in the public sphere. Drawing from key theorists discussed during the MA seminar, Politics of Participation. The event will take the form of two short introductions on a specific aspect of interest followed by a panel discussion led by the ACW course team.

Organised by GUM collective members Stephen Lau and Sadbh O’Brien, in collaboration with Masters Programs, Art in the Contemporary World at National College of Art and Design, Dublin www.acw.ie

More info at : https://www.nationalgallery.ie/public-and-political

Image and artwork by Sofya Mikhaylova

Austin Hearne – ‘Remains’ opening/ artist talk at Pallas Projects/Studios

Austin Hearne—Remains

Opening reception: 6–8pm Thursday 19th April 2018
Exhibition runs: 12–6pm Thursday 19th – Saturday 28th April
Gallery open: Thursday–Saturday
Artist’s talk: Saturday 28th April 2pm, in conversation with ACW alumni Michelle Hall

Pallas Projects/Studios are pleased to present Austin Hearne—Remains the second exhibition of our Artist-Initiated Projects programme.

“The visual and architectural apparatus of the Church is the embodiment of Catholic doctrine; promulgating the notion that one must submit oneself entirely, body and soul, to be a ‘good’ Catholic. Austin Hearne’s work reflects upon this but also injects a frisson of titillation via an irreverent and occasionally dark celebration of its sensuality.”

—excerpt from Of Lillies and Remains, Pádraic E. Moore

What remains when the other parts have been taken away, consumed, rotted. The Catholic Church is sick, dying, dead, remaining. Its remains stubborn, permanent – can not and will not rot. They are an empty carcass, leftover, ready to be re-inhabited, reanimated by the next wave in its sicker, deadlier form.

Austin Hearne’s practice is rooted in photography wherein he explores its possibilities to produce installations, objects and performances that expand the limits of the photograph and indeed the medium. Prints, furnishings, wallpapers, garments and the materials of the painting and decorating industry all feature, carrying his created imagery and weaved narratives which merge fact and fiction, creating worlds, characters and scenarios that may or may not exist.

Hearne’s research stems from an analysis of the surfaces, iconography and politics of the Catholic Church, with the churches of Dublin and beyond serving as impetus for works in this show. The majesty and misery of this institution’s past and present dwells in the exhibition, with Hearne presenting photographs as interior decor and furniture. One of these pieces entitled Slab, a functional painter and decorator’s wallpaper pasting table acts as a storyboard, holding constructed photographs coalesced with archival documentary photos from the artist’s archive. This amalgamation of photographic work spans two decades posing narratives that the viewer can but glean.

More info at: http://pallasprojects.org/index.php/project/austin-hearneremains

HOUSE TAKEN OVER

A weekend of talks, performances and artist responses within a historical home in South Belfast curated by Hickey + Hickey, featuring ACW student Dorothy HUNTER.

Exhibiting Artists
Sighle BHREATHNACH-CASHELL, Joseph BEUYS, Declan CLARKE, John D’ARCY, Irina GHEORGHE, Allan HUGHES, Tom HUGHES, Dorothy HUNTER, Alexey KRASNOVSKY, Gillian LAWLER, Julie LOVETT, Roseanne LYNCH, Colin MARTIN, Lorcan McGEOUGH, Una MONAGHAN, Maeve O’LYNN, Tullis RENNIE, Penelope WARD, AMINI (Artist’s Moving Image Northern Ireland)

This exhibition is made in response to a recent unexpected discovery about the house. During WW2 it held a secret function as the Northern Irish Intelligence Headquarters for a covert operation involving a network of secret listeners who tuned in to their radio sets in homes across the province listening to enemy communications. The logs recorded by the listeners were forwarded to ‘Heathcote’, where they were transferred directly to codebreakers in Bletchley Park to be decrypted.

www.housetakenover.com
www.sonorities.org.uk

Events Programme – Friday 20 – Sunday 22 April 2018

Friday 6pm – 8pm Opening Reception
Friday 7pm Opening Performance: HIVE Choir
Saturday 2pm Reading: Julio Cortázar’s ‘House Taken Over’ followed by new exhibition response by Maeve O’Lynn
Saturday 3pm Performance: Tullis Rennie
Sunday 11am Lecture: Penelope Ward
Sunday 1pm Screening: Presented by AMINI with talk by Jaqueline Holt
Sunday 3pm Performance: Tullis Rennie

Opening Times for exhibition (viewing by appointment)
Saturday 21 April, 11am – 5pm
Sunday 22 April, 11am- 5pm

For more information, to view the exhibition or to book an event please email us at hickeyandhickey2018@gmail.com

Sonorities
House Taken Over is presented as part of the Sonorities Festival organised by the Sonic Arts Research Centre at Queen’s University Belfast and includes work that draws on core festival themes: forms of listening, techno-human encounters and matters such as machine-listening and audio-coding.

This project is generously supported by the British Council. With thanks to Irish Art Courier and Golden Thread Gallery

Centre Culturel Irlandais, Paris: House Taken Over is part one of a project which will result in a group exhibition on surveillance in the Centre Culturel Irlandais in Paris (September – December 2018) and in Solstice Arts Centre Navan in 2019.

Hickey + Hickey is the collaborative curatorial practice of sisters Ciara Hickey (Learning Producer at Hillsborough Castle since 2017, Co-Director of Household Belfast and former Curator at Belfast Exposed) and Nora Hickey M’Sichili (Director of the Centre Culturel Irlandais in Paris, Ireland’s International Arts Centre, since 2013 and former Director of Mermaid Arts Centre in Bray).

Day-ennial in collaboration with University of Glasgow

This year we’re delighted to welcome MA students from Glasgow University who are visiting on Monday-Wed 26-8th March. The trip is being lead by Dominic Paterson, lecturer in History of Art and curator of Contemporary Art at Glasgow University.

With a day of planned visits to contemporary art galleries in Dublin the itinerary is as follows:

Tuesday 27th, Day-ennial

10.30am – meet at RHA cafe

11am – talk/tour of RHA with Katy Fitzpatrick

12pm – Kerlin Gallery, talk with Rosa Abbott

12.45-1.30 lunch

2.15pm – The LAB, talk with Sheena Barrett

3.30pm – Project Arts Center, talk with Lívia Páldi

4.30pm – Douglas Hyde Gallery

6.30 Liliane Lijn talk at Douglas Hyde

*Subject to change



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