Archived entries for Exhibition

Old Invitations A DHG Student Forum response to the DHG archive

A DHG Student Forum response to the DHG archive
Thursday 28 February 2019, 1pm–8pm

Since March 2018, we’ve been celebrating 40 years of The Douglas Hyde Gallery, looking back through the DHG archive on Instagram under the hashtag #dhgat40, and gathering reflections from artists and audiences.

On 28 February, we will conclude our year-long anniversary celebrations with a special exhibition and series of performances over one afternoon and evening, curated by the DHG Student Forum.

Join us in the gallery on the 28th to explore Student Forum members’ responses to 40 years of programming at the DHG.

PROGRAMME

GALLERY 1

1pm–2pm
Automatic Writing Workshop with Eimear Regan

Taking inspiration from methods of practice of Hilma af Klint, whose paintings were shown in Gallery 2 in 2004 as part of The Paradise exhibition series (2001–2013), Eimear Regan will conduct an Automatic Writing Workshop. Participants will be encouraged to let their hand guide the process while developing a piece of new writing. No experience is necessary to participate in the workshop.

Open to all, but places are limited. To reserve a place, email dhgallery@tcd.ie.

2pm–5pm
Exhibition open to the public, including:

Visionary Art at the DHG – Research paper by Eimear Regan
A research paper following a timeline of visionary art that has been displayed throughout the gallery’s 40-year programme. The Kilim carpets in 1979, the Kalachakra Sand Mandala made by Tibetan monks in the gallery in 1994, K.F. Schobinger’s exhibition of drawings in 2006 (part of The Paradise exhibition series) and Tamara Henderson’s 2018 exhibition Season’s End: More Than Suitcases are just a few of the exhibitions touched on. This paper discusses the thread of attempting to make sense of the mysterious world through artistic practice and aspires to cover artists who have shown in the gallery and whose work has visionary qualities and aims. The research project will be discussed during the public seminar.

Re-Aftermath – 3D projection by Theo Hynan-Ratcliffe
This work consists of four separate videos repeated to form a skin-like cladding for the foundation of the gallery site. An audio piece which acts as the pulse of the archive, an archive soundscape punctuated by definitions of words used to describe the archive and used to describe the intention of intervening in the DHG’s archival materials. The rhythmic action of interacting with the physical archive and the repetitive hypnotic act of turning pages of history, generate skin, body and physicality. The human marks that act as the skeleton of the archive bring the increments of history back into the gallery itself as a physical presence in the space.

5.30pm–6.45pm
Public Seminar: Led by Aisling Ní Aodha, Laurence Counihan and Eimear Regan.

Open to all, no booking required.

7.30pm–8pm
Fleeced! by Isadora Epstein

Fleeced! is a new performance by Isadora Epstein about the mythical Golden Fleece and the 1990 Anselm Kiefer exhibition Jason and the Argonauts. The theatrical lecture will be accompanied by musician/composer Sinéad Onóra Kennedy and choreographer/dancer Aoibhinn O’Dea.

Open to all, but places are limited. To reserve a place, email dhgallery@tcd.ie. Due to the nature of the performance, there can be no late admittance.

GALLERY 2

1pm–8pm
An epistolary exchange with Richard Skelton, by Siobhán Kane

Siobhán Kane invited the artist Richard Skelton into an epistolary dialogue, to revisit his 2011 work Landings for The Douglas Hyde Gallery, and further explore some of his thoughts on landscape, art and the vital role of archiving. What emerges both surprises and educates, putting forward the idea that no art is finite. Through a small installation, both audio and textual, Kane pays homage to the original exhibition of Landings, and its idea of immersion as touchstone.

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Image: Student Forum archival research meeting at The Douglas Hyde Gallery, 16 October 2018.

You, Me and Everything In Between workshop conducted by ACW students in the RHA

Art in the Contemporary World work with the RHA for Learning and Public Engagement, Futures Series 3, Episode 2 with Dublin Youth Dance Company

Working closely with the RHA, Katy Fitzpatrick and Róisín Bohan for the Public Engagement and Learning program for the current Futures exhibition, ACW students, Brendan Fox, Natalie Pullen and Éimear Regan developed You, Me and Everything In Between. A theatrical workshop loosely based around Augusto Boal’s Theatre of the Oppressed, where participants were encouraged to manifest a performative narrative connecting the exhibition content. The artists featuring in Futures Series 3, Episode 2 exhibition are Bassam Al-Sabah, Cecilia Danell, Laura Fitzgerald, Jennifer Mehigan, Joanne Reid and Marcel Vidal. The work on display by each artist in Futures is unconnected and seemingly disparate as the exhibition is a display of their own personal practice rather than a group show that relates to a specific theme or greater narrative. The challenge set forth in the workshop was to develop a constellation between the artists’ work on display, with an outcome of producing and creating a wholly separate piece of performance art. The artists in the Futures exhibition also contributed to the workshop by donating personal objects for a further insight into their world. Among the objects donated were a paint pot cast from layers upon layers of paint, a silver mask and a metal rod. Members of the Dublin Youth Dance Company directed by Mariam Ribon, were invited to participate in the 3-hour-long workshop which took place on Saturday 15 December. The first half of the workshop began with the 11 participants viewing and taking in the work, followed by a meditation and then contained a series of exercises influenced by Boal’s practice where there was a discussion and consequently where the generation of ideas for a narrative emerged. During the second half of the workshop the DYDC participants were divided into three groups and were instructed to develop their narrative of the exhibition through three “moments” that established a final performance. Materials were provided by the facilitators Fox, Pullen and Regan to aid the development and theatricality of the narrative, encouraging the participants to engage in producing a fully embodied piece of art. The dancers infused themselves into the workshop and the outcome was outstanding. Each group performed their finished piece within the space with the artworks as a backdrop. The dancers’ commitment to the workshop was phenomenal and the creative energy generated in the space was quite special.

Éimear Regan, MA Art in the Contemporary World

All photographs by Brendan Fox

six seville

six seville
6 Seville Place, Dublin 1

six seville opens on Friday 30th November, 7 – 9pm

Exhibition continues Saturday 1st – Sunday 2nd December, 8am – 4.30pm

six seville features work by Conall Kelleher, Andreas Kindler von Knobloch, Áine McBride, Blaine O’Donnell, Liliane Puthod, Conal Ryan and Tanad Williams in a formerly vacant building now used as a studio space.

Review: Furtive Tears by Niamh McCann at The Hugh Lane Gallery by Brendan Fox (ACW)

A New Occult and Encounters with the Invisible Man

A review of Furtive Tears, 4 October 2018 – 6 January 2019 by Niamh McCann at The Hugh Lane Gallery, Dublin, 2018.

Rodin's The Age of Bronze AKA The Awakening Man AKA The Vanquished One (masked) - Box Steel Frame, Walnut Burl Veneer Panel, Painted Panel, nuts and bolts, The Age of Bronze by Auguste Rodin from Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane’s collection - 2018.Photo Credit: Ruarí Conaty.

Occultation; n. (Astronomy); The passage of a celestial object across the line of sight between an observer and another celestial object; as when the moon moves between the Earth and the sun in a solar eclipse.

Beckoning us through ghostly operatic echoes as we ascend the stoic neoclassical staircase of the Hugh Lane Gallery, McCann’s video work Furtive Tears, Salomé’s Lament eventually drenches us in
an opulent fusion of Richard Strauss’s Salomé and Donizetti’s Una Furtiva Lagrima from here the hybridism of language and landscape becomes only more strange.

An imposing screen seduces us. Boris, a suited man, appears to await our arrival and scales the grandiose marble staircase of Belfast City Hall in a pair of red high heels. In a duo of impassioned tableau vivant’s he mimics the stance of Sir Edward Carson’s statue, situated at Stormont Castle, Belfast, followed by the Jim Larkin monument on O’Connell Street, just meters away. Both prominent twentieth century political figures immortalised in a state of dramatic public address. Outside the gallery they tower over contemporary cities fraught with new political uncertainties, their power redundant, their bodies now relics cast in silence. McCann breathes a last breath into their predominance and within it gives us space to reassess our own position in relation to both historic and contemporary power structures.
In the following scene we follow Boris’s continued ascension as he scales the Ridge View of Black Mountain leaving Belfast city behind having swapped his suit for a panda costume. Still wearing his red shoes, we witness him meandering through dewy grass, climbing fences and encountering mildly inconvenienced cows. He again mimics these political ghosts but this time the man is hidden, masked, he has become a cartoon. The dramatic inhabitance of these two iconic statues becomes a pathetic historical indistinct echo falling on deaf ears. We see his physical intentions without the details of expression, he is present but not apparent, something has passed between us and him obscuring our perspective, our reality.

This notion of occultation is pushed further in the adjoining gallery as we encounter our third immortalised male figure in a work wryly entitled The Age of Bronze AKA The Awakening Man AKA The Vanquished One (masked) pertaining to Rodin’s multi named bronze cast male figure (1876-77), a piece from the Hugh Lane Collection. McCann encases the gallery’s own Age of Bronze in a sharp green box frame, his head and upper body obscured with two panels, one blue the other a walnut burl veneer. This is a mongrel of the opposing sides of modernism but beyond its formal and art historical loft dwells a new space for interpretation. Through McCann’s geometric addition the figure of the naked bronze solider appears vulnerable, even caged. As the linear mechanism contrasts with the details and curvatures of his lower anatomy a palpable intimacy develops, yet he cannot “see” us, he is a pawn in a statement, to be looked at but not fully engaged with.

These historic male statues and monuments bare a contemporary vulnerability. McCann is redistributing notions of power and how we perceive it. She confidently harnesses these icons like a child might put batteries in an old toy and asks us to look again. Paradoxically there is a sense of the prophetic here, these historic regurgitations feel immediate and succeed through McCann’s ubiquitous intentions, her place amid the current socio-political zeitgeist and our own conception of the dawning of a new order.

In another gallery a taxidermied fawn towers above us, its head suffocated with a zipped black balloon, its fore limbs extended to its rear with black curved rods as it precariously sits, like a rocking horse, atop a box frame plinth, containing a dangling umbilical-esque blue neon tube light. From a height a pair of white voile drapes partially veil the rich blue walls before theatrically pouring to the floor surrounding an offering of fresh lilies, their fragrance inhabiting the space in a sharp organic sweetness as if Salomé herself was present, seducing us, dancing the Seven Veils amid this mise-en- scène tempered with sacrifice, vulnerability and power. These works lean on us as viewers to decipher what we do not see, or what McCann chooses to occult; they deftly summon forth the invisible. In the same room a large bronze nose cast from Seamus Murphy’s marble bust of Michael Collins (1949), another work from the Hugh Lane Collection, sits on a faux classical plinth, faceless, ironically pointing at a second green pedestal with a pair of destroyed aviator sunglasses. The monumental male is almost invisible now, surviving only by a nose, snorting contemporary air, like a man drowning in history or to quote Salomé in “black lakes troubled by fantastic moons.”

Art critic Rosalind Krauss writes of the logic of sculpture as being inseparable from the logic of the monument, “It sits in a particular place and speaks in a symbolical tongue about the meaning or use of that place”. McCann’s landscape of artefacts is profoundly routed in the space it inhabits; it is of the institution and rebels tangibly and intellectually within that frame. It is quite literally a Trojan horse, it is a series interventional contraptions concealing rebels and soldiers.

Here Salomé no longer dances alone under the gaze of men McCann’s ideas head bang alongside her, amid the Hugh Lane collection, like their parents have gone out of town. Furtive Tears is a spiky romantic affair it confronts us with fact and fiction, real and faux. Like Parrhasius’s curtain the perceived occultation is the work. As McCann’s objects pass between us and the past they momentarily eclipse history and in that darkness dwells a new constellation offering us portals into the alternative, interrogating socio-political shifts and arguing the legitimacy of the relics of politics and art, placing us at the centre of our own truths and preconceived ideas of our idiosyncratic place in story that is history.

Brendan Fox is an artist, curator, film maker and writer living in Dublin, he is currently studying MA Art in the Contemporary World, NCAD

www.brendanfoxart.com

Make Haste, Slowly at the Return Gallery


Photo Credit: Louis Haugh

Make Haste, Slowly
Return Gallery Goethe-Institut Irland, 37 Merrion Square, Dublin 2.

A collectively curated, scripted, performed, and presented exercise in radical pedagogies by the MA Art in the Contemporary World: Jack Cole, Dominique Crowley, Padraig Cunningham, Stephanie Deady, María del Buey, Tamara Derksen, Nicole Di Sandro, Brendan Fox,
Kate Friedeberg, Valerie Joyce, Seánan Kerr, Heidee Martin, Grainne Murphy, Orlaith Phelan, Natalie Pullen, Éimear Regan, and Laura Skublics.
With artworks and collaborations featuring Basil Al
Rawi, Jane’s Bees, Jasmin Marker, Repeater Collective, Noel Sheridan, John Smith, and David and Sally Shaw-Smith. Presented in the context of Liam Gillick’s Denominator Platform 2018, specially commissioned by Art in the Contemporary World for the Return Gallery.
Make Haste, Slowly is part of Common Denominator: Art in the Contemporary World at the Goethe-Institut, a two-year programme that takes as its starting point Walter Gropius’s term, from which collective knowledges progress. Through exhibitions, events, seminars and more we will interrogate and inhabit what it means in our time to speak of political solidarity, civic standards, or even aesthetic values, and to consider
the relation between common commitments and necessary possibilities of individual belief, expression and action.
Art in the Contemporary World is Ireland’s leading taught MA at the National College of Art & Design in Dublin.
Our students are avid researchers whose focus is to advance a project with the aim of understanding, interrogating,
and expanding the role of contemporary practices and their contexts. ACW is led by Francis Halsall, Declan Long and Sarah Pierce.
Supported by the Goethe-Institut Irland in collaboration with the National College of Art & Design. Special thanks to the Kerlin Gallery and IMMA | Irish Museum of Modern Art.


Opening
30th November 2018 6 – 9pm
Exhibition runs through 12th January 2019
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Memento Aldi, Danny Kelly at deAppendix

Memento Aldi, Danny Kelly at deAppendix, 30 Ardagh Grove, Blackrock.

Run: 23rd Oct – 7th Dec 2018

Memento Aldi is an installation of Danny Kelly’s recent painting at DeAppendix. Kelly’s work elaborates a subjective sphere of heterogeneous features comprising tropes of painting culture and items of biographical significance. A protean topography traverses the work’s pictorial content, objective environmental and material properties, and interpreted public and personal cultures – intimations of chart music and domestic miscellanea. Dynamics of disintegration and consolidation alternate, suggesting an accidental crucible breeding ephemeral hybrids. A visceral, crudely drawn practice emerges – playing with cohesiveness, personal identity and public visuality – and is embraced as a pidgin chart music.

Further info : contactdeappendix@gmail.com / 012785866

deAppendix is a cultural space co-located with a GP surgery and hosts a calendar of contemporary art exhibitions and artists talks. Through it’s programme deAppendix challenges how such spaces are activated and in so doing questions accepted norms for this genre of space. deAppendix is a project by Ciara McMahon whose art practice frequently examines the potential for hybridity between the disciplines of Art and Medicine. For further information see: www.deappendix.wordpress.com, or find us on Facebook, or we can be contacted at contactdeappendix@gmail.com

ACW Paul Roy Featured in Print Exhibition at Lessedra Gallery Bulgaria

Contemporary Printmaking from Ireland

November 1 – November 25, 2018

In a cooperation with Leinster Printmaking Studio
38 artists with 63 large size works

“The exhibition will be opened by H.E. Michael Forbes, Ambassador of Ireland to Bulgaria, at a reception on Thursday, 1 November, at 6 PM.
The Irish artists Margaret Becker, Pamela de Bri, Katherine Smits and Melissa Cherry will also be present.”

For more information:

href=”http://http://www.lessedra.com/gallery.php?d=current”>

Island Life, group show featuring Stephanie Deady, ACW

Island Life – Westport

25TH October – 25th November 2018

Custom House Studios & Gallery

Westport Quay

Co.Mayo

A conversation with some of the artists will be held on Thursday the 25th October at 5.30pm.

Sonia Shiel, Nevan Lahart, Sinéad Ní Mhaonaigh, Kathy Tynan, Aileen Murphy, Marcel Vidal, Stephanie Deady, Stephen Loughman, Lesley-Ann O’Connell, Cecilia Danell, William O’Neill, Pat Byrne, Salvatore of Lucan, Robert Armstrong, Mark Swords, Dermot Seymour, Julia Dubsky and Joe Scullion.

Island Life will have it’s second outing later this month in Custom House Studios Gallery, Westport. The exhibition will include some new works by previously exhibited artists as well as the addition of Nevan Lahart, Aileen Murphy, Dermot Seymour, and Sinéad Ní Mhaonaigh.

Painting exists in an increasingly sophisticated visual world that sometimes seems to have a diminishing interest in the possibilities of paint. Island Life is concerned with the idea that, within the medium of paint there are opportunities for the individual to question the situation we live in and the resources we share. The paintings in this exhibition address the human condition and each of the artists suggests the capacity of the medium of paint to encompass both personal and universal concerns.

Gerard Byrne “In Our Time” in Conversation with Declan Long in collaboration with ACW


Gerard Byrne in conversation with Declan Long as part of a MA Art in the Contemporary World collaboration will take place at the Kerlin Gallery, Thursday 7 December, 5pm.

“For his solo exhibition at Kerlin Gallery, Gerard Byrne presents a new video installation, In Our Time. Commissioned for the 2017 edition of Skulptur Projekte Münster, In Our Time depicts the daily activities of an archetypal commercial radio station, provoking questions around the relationship between radio broadcasting, time, pop music and collective memory. The exhibition will open with a reception in the company of the artist on Friday 1 December, 6–8pm.”
Exhibition runs from 2 December 2017 – 20 January 2018

To book this talk please email rosa@kerlin.ie

For more information please visit: http://www.kerlingallery.com/exhibitions/gerard-byrne

A Portrait: Lough Key by Anna Macleod & Padraig Cunningham

A Portrait: Lough Key
by Anna Macleod & Padraig Cunningham

Minister for Communications, Climate Action and Environment,
Denis Naughten
will officially launch the exhibition at
6pm, November 10th, 2017 at the Roscommon Arts Centre

Exhibition runs from:
10th November 2017 – 12th January 2018

Lough Key has been home to communities of humans for millennia, as a body of water it has functioned as a place of refuge and contemplation, as a trade route and economy, as a site for recreation and stability. The ecology of this body of water can be seen as a site of constant renewal, a waterway of connectivity between manmade and naturally occurring parcels of land dotted throughout the surface of the waters. In the communities that continue to live in the vicinity of this watery world, Lough Key commands huge, almost visceral, affection as a repository of memory, of time passed in aquatic suspension, as an intense emotional mirror of celestial and temporal bodies. The constant movement of the water, its undercurrents and surface tensions create a hypnotic dream world of interconnected realms of the states of water, as vapour, as liquid, as solid.

For this years’ iteration of the Park Project, commissioned artist Anna Macleod chose to work in collaboration with Boyle based artist Padraig Cunningham. They worked with community members to create a portrait of Lough Key as a time-scape through the life cycle of the Mayfly (order: Ephemeroptera) from the Greek, meaning ‘living a day’. A Portrait: Lough Key installation at Roscommon Art Centre explores the motif of the Mayfly as a portal to the complex reflective upside down worlds of this body of water, a delicate and vulnerable world of domesticity, constant flux and potential.

With many thanks to Paul Wynn, Colm Walsh, Damien Walsh and Danny Shanley of Lough Key Boat Tours.
Field underwater recordings with kind permission from Ciarán MacAoidh.

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About the Park Project
The Park Project takes on the form of a residency that allows an artist to occupy the spaces in and around Lough Key in Co. Roscommon, collecting history and exchanging knowledge that will inform their future work, while working within the historical and contemporary contexts of the site.

The Park Project was developed by curator Linda Shevlin and is supported by Roscommon Arts Centre & Roscommon County Council Arts Office.

LOST STATE – Hugh McCabe & Suzanne Walsh at Draíocht Arts Centre

LOST STATE
Hugh McCabe & Suzanne Walsh
Curated by Sharon Murphy
19 October – 4th November
Opening event including performance by Suzanne Walsh at 7pm on Thursday October 19th 2017
Gallery 2, Draíocht, Blanchardstown

LOST STATE is a collaborative mixed-media exhibition by Hugh McCabe and Suzanne Walsh consisting of photography, voice, audio and digitally generated video.

“Thrones and dominions” the Finn said obscurely “Yeah, there’s things out there. Ghosts, voices. Why not? Oceans had mermaids, all that shit, and we had a sea of silicon … ”

William Gibson, Count Zero (1986)

How will our present technological moment be perceived from the perspective of the future? In our anthropocentric era where evidence of human-driven climate change mounts and rumours of the coming singularity abound, can we be confident that our steady rate of scientific progress won’t suffer a rupture? What fictions will be created to fill the resultant gaps? What myths will emerge from the residue of the information age?

Lost State sets out to explore these questions using as its starting point a series of photographs shot from the imagined point of view of future archaeologists exploring the technological detritus of our time. A fractured speculative narrative alludes to the circumstances and significance of this discovery and invokes memories of human-technological mourning and loss. A digitally generated film simulates this imaginary exploration in order to question how image production technologies shape our perceptions of the past and of the future.

The work aims to trouble the boundaries between various categories: the organic and the inorganic; the imagined future and the perceived past; the human and the technological; the analogue and the digital; the secular and the sacred.

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Still and moving images by Hugh McCabe
Words and sound by Suzanne Walsh
3D Modelling by Vincent O’Reilly

Also opening in Gallery 1 on the same evening is Elaine Hoey’s award-winning VR artwork, The Weight Of Water. Both exhibitions will be opened by Fiach Mac Conghail, CEO, The Digital Hub. Launching on the night will also be the inaugural Draíocht Visual Culture Award for a Graduate of the Creative Digital Media Programme at the Institute of Technology Blanchardstown.

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Hugh McCabe is a Dublin-based lecturer, musician and artist. He is graduate of the MA ‘Art In the Contemporary World’ course at NCAD and teaches critical theory and 3D graphics at the Institute of Technology Blanchardstown.

Suzanne Walsh is an artist, writer and musician whose cross-disciplinary work moves between the literary, music and art worlds. Suzanne is also a graduate of the MA ‘Art In The Contemporary World’ course. She is currently a resident artist at Fire Station Artists’ Studios.

http://www.tracesofthereal.com

RDS Visual Art Awards

ACW alumnus Michelle Hall has received the R.C. Lewis-Crosby Award at the year’s RDS Visual Art Awards. The Exhibition is free to attend and runs at the RDS Concert Hall from Wednesday, October 26 to Monday 31, 10.30am – 6.00pm daily, with late opening Thursday, October 27 until 8.00pm.

Exhibitors:

Bassam Al-Sabah, Megan Burns, Susan Buttner, Marcus Craig, Aoife Dunne, Michelle Hall, Elaine Hoey, Justyna Kielbowicz, Siobhán O’Connor, Jane Rainey, Joanne Reid, Sven Sandberg and Laura Skehan.

The 2016 RDS Visual Art Awards Winners are:

Aoife Dunne – RDS Monster Truck Studio Award

Michelle Hall – R.C. Lewis-Crosby Award

Sven Sandberg – R.C. Lewis-Crosby Award

Elaine Hoey – RDS Taylor Art Award

October 27, RDS Library Speaker Series “Reservoir” talk by Alice Maher at 6.30pm

For mor information visit: http://www.rds.ie/Ireland-s-Philanthropic-Society/Our-Work/Projects/RDS-Visual-Art-Awards-(1)

There Are Little Kindoms


Adrian Duncan, Sabina MacMahon, Eamon O’Kane and Kathy Tynan curated by Emma Dwyer

Thu 11 Feb – Sat 19 Mar 2016

There Are Little Kingdoms features the work of four Irish artists – who each tell us their own story. From King James II enjoying a meal under a sycamore tree at the house of John Keyes and later burning everything in the area but that house, to the submerged forest of Bray beach, the logs from Finland which have turned our soil Scandinavian and the motivational wheelie bins of Dublin 8. Every tree, house, town and mountain has a story. Whether it’s the absurd, historical, fictional or anchored in unbelievable fact. Meaning can be slippy and a slight change in the way we look at something can completely change how we see it. What these four artists have in common is a sideways glance at the world and their place in it.

http://www.mermaidartscentre.ie/exhibitions/details/there-are-little-kindoms

Hands Laid On: Aileen Murphy & Kathy Tynan


Hands Laid On Aileen Murphy & Kathy Tynan

January 7th – 30th, 2016
Opening: Thursday January 7th, 6pm, Kevin Kavanagh Gallery

In response to the question ‘why paint?’ featured in the January 2014 issue of frieze magazine, artist Ellen Altfest specified, ‘Looking over a long time is like an attempt to merge with something outside of oneself. The dense accumulation of visual information, which is the product of this kind of looking, is different from how the lens and the eye usually see the world.’

Through the activities of walking and looking Kathy Tynan identifies alternative landmarks in the city, places to rest the eyes that give rise to contemplation. Tynan observes and informally records visual quirks in her surroundings and such vagaries are later bestowed with temporal emphasis through the medium of paint. In the cracks of a pebble dashed wall and across a surface of uneven plaster, real word surfaces and textures appear elevated through keen observation. Slogans and symbols scrawled or sprayed across gable ends, crows looking on, trinkets in a stranger’s porch; all distract from the path ahead.

Aileen Murphy’s canvases are lurid and brassy with strong sweeping brush strokes that evoke activity and dance. Energy takes precedence as the painted image is contained but always threatens to breach the border of the canvas, a yellow interior emblazoned by broad swathes of blue paint depicts an athletically contorted woman mid-pirouette or falling. Murphy works from swiftly made drawings creating seamless gestures of movement. They are ‘feeling’ rather than ‘thinking’ paintings that are concerned with human emotion and the human condition in which tales of drama and lust abound.

Both Murphy and Tynan paint in a way that is frank and full of integrity, in which humour alternates with genuine pathos. Hands Laid On comprises paintings that relate to one another in a manner that is both reciprocal and divergent.

Kathy Tynan (b.1984) graduated with a BA in Fine Art Painting in 2008 from the National College of Art and Design. She returned to NCAD to complete an MA in Art in the Contemporary World. Tynan has exhibited in many group shows. Recent exhibitions include The Future is Self Organised, LCGA, Limerick, 2015, Buff, Sim Gallery, Reykjavik, 2015, What is And What Might Be, Highlanes Gallery Drogheda, 2015, Panorama, Pallas Projects, Dublin, 2015 as well as a solo exhibition; The Sky is All Changed, Hendrons Collider, Dublin, 2014. Tynan’s work is held in many notable public and private collections.

Aileen Murphy (b.1984) graduated with a BA in Fine Art Painting in 2007 from the National College of Art and Design. She is currently embarking on an MA at the highly regarded HFBK Städelschule in Frankfurt. Murphy has participated in a number of group shows including Stuffing. Johan, Frankfurt, 2015, Here and Now, Greenacres, 2015, Panorama, Pallas Projects, Dublin, 2015 as well as solo exhibition; Guano Fruit, Ormond Studios, Dublin, 2013. Aileen Murphy has participated in numerous residencies and collaborations including Soft Blonde Moustache, a Dublin based drawing collective. Murphy will show with 321 Gallery, New York in January 2016.

State of Play

‘First Awake Moment’

First Awake Moment
Ingrid Lyons, Lesley Ann O’Connell, Kathy Tynan

http://www.pallasprojects.org/

Opening Thursday, April 18, 6-8pm

Group discussion on the exhibition
Friday, April 19, 6pm

The exhibition will be open from Friday, April 18 – Sunday, April 21, from 12pm to 6pm each day.

The Project Space at PP/S is an open, accessible and versatile space that bridges studio and exhibition practice.
It features throughout the year, internally–curated projects, talks and events, alongside external, artist–initiated projects, workshops, performances or large-scale studio use.
The Project Space is intended to allow access for creative, motivated and professionally minded individuals and groups working within contemporary visual art and like-minded fields, to experiment with presenting their work and engage with audiences; to work in the context of a space with a dedicated tradition – ongoing over a seventeen year period – towards do-it- yourself initiatives and the professional development of emerging artists.

Project Space at PP/S Pallas Projects/Studios 115–117 The Coombe Dublin 8
Project Space at PP/S April 18 – 21

First Awake Moment documents a period in time in which Ingrid Lyons, Lesley Ann O’Connell, and Kathy Tynan have been independently focusing on and developing their painting and drawing practices. This exhibition acts as a pause for contemplation and recognition of the past year and reflects on things learned, forgotten, lost, and discovered.

Ingrid Lyons’ drawings describe a personal and contemporary experience of landscape and place. Hazy views recalled from the windows of moving cars and trains are rendered with intimacy and intricacy but they remain atmospherically remote, ghostly, and impermanent. This feeling of movement and passing time creates distance between the viewer and the remembered scenes, heightened by layers of cinematic shadow and light. The places and situations in Lyons’ drawings hint at a search for belonging from a position of uncertainty and detachment.
Lyons is currently undertaking the Art in the Contemporary World MA at NCAD.
Untitled 2012 30 x 21 cm

Lesley Ann O’Connell’s paintings begin with acts of rigorous looking and focused observational drawing. A process of decision making that is intuitive and fluid emerges with the introduction of paint, and the outside world becomes internalised, surrendering to a multitude of textures and colours. The latest of O’Connell’s paintings document the transitory phase of a return to the family home – an environment in which surrounding objects can be at once familiar and alien. The patterns of a carpet or the way light falls in a certain room are among the many influences that form a wealth of conflicts and sensibilities.
O’Connell is currently undertaking an MFA at NCAD.
Patch Work 2013 Oil on canvas 50 x 60 cm

Kathy Tynan makes energetic and compassionate paintings of friends and places of personal significance. Frozen within a moment, figures and buildings merge into their surroundings as the wind whips up leaves and clouds career and swirl through the sky. Tynan’s concentrated yet carefree technique allows essence, mood, and affection to emerge from sometimes unintentional gestures. By embracing these imperfections and uncertainties, the heart of her subjects is revealed, and a more open and magical experience within each moment blooms.
Tynan is a resident artist in Pallas Studios.
Carried along by a river and also by sleep 2013 Oil on canvas 30 x 21 cm

While there are signs of doubt, anxiety, and awkwardness in each of the artists’ works there is a mutual understanding of nature and landscape, home, the familiar and the everyday, memory, and friendship. First Awake Moment provides a space for all of these elements to come together and to be considered in this way for a brief moment in time.

The artists would like to extend a very special thanks to our friend and colleague Michael Hill, for his support and guidance throughout the planning of this exhibition.

Please use the following contact details for any enquiries:
Michael Hill – thatmichael@gmail.com
Ingrid Lyons – ingridlyons@hotmail.com
Lesley Ann O’Connell – ilikeirishweather@gmail.com
Kathy Tynan – kathy.tynster@gmail.com

Raivo Puusemp – Dissolution

For those of you that can attend, this sounds interesting.

To mark the opening of the exhibition Raivo PuusempDissolution, Project Arts Centre is
delighted to welcome curator Krist Gruijthuijsen to Dublin. On Thursday 8 November at 5pm, he
will host a walk-through tour of the gallery, speaking about the development of the ideas behind
the exhibition, the processes involved in researching and developing the show, and the wider
practice of participating artists Raivo Puusemp (EE/US) and Ben Kinmont (US).

This exhibition is the first comprehensive overview of Puusemp’s work produced between the mid-
1960s and late 1970s. The exhibition presents documentation and materials around Rosendale,
A Public Work, a number of his early sculptural works and one recent artwork. Presented
alongside these are related works by artist Ben Kinmont that negotiate the notion of withdrawal
and artistic contextualisation. Printed matter surrounding the work of the two artists will be
available to take away on the evening, as well as a limited edition re-print of Puusemp’s
publication – Rosendale, A Public Work, which will be available to purchase for €5.

KRF Notebook Project 2012

Kathy O’Leary writes about the KRF Notebook Project.

I arrived at the opening of KRF Notebook Project in Newbridge, Kildare after eventually escaping the challenge of the traffic from the merging N7/M7 out of Dublin following my MA course, Art in the Contemporary World at NCAD on Thomas Street.

Once I negotiated the ‘blue badge’ parking and the inclining ramp outside the Riverbank Arts Centre, which someone was kind enough to help me get up. I entered to receive a warm reception with a brightly coloured, cosy cafe, treating me to a great cappuccino. I sat amongst Brenda Brady, Arts Assistant, Kildare County County Council, Susan Boyle, curator of the exhibition, Nicola Dunne, Arts in Health Specialist and Lucina Russell, Kildare County Council Arts Officer, who cordially welcomed me while surrounded by many others who had made the effort of attending the night.

Ann Egan, a multi award-winning poet, who lives in Clane and has held many writing residencies, introduced us to a vivid live reading of her poetry before I took the lift to view the exhibition of over a 100 artists notebooks. I gasped with excitement, as I entered to see such creativity held within the notebooks laid out on several different tables in the space. How refreshing to be able to access an exhibition in such a way that you could open and touch the art works to discover the inner workings of an artists’ practice and the journey’s traveled while creating the notebook. Continue reading…

Wine Soak no. 1

The first in a series of occasional columns in which noted flâneur and wine expert, Jacob Ligvine Kreek, reports on what was on offer at a recent Dublin exhibition opening.

I had the extreme pleasure of soaking up a mixed bag of international selections at the Pallas Project’s space in Dominic Street last Friday night. The experience began with a palatable young Cabernet Sauvignon from Chile, Casa Leona 2010. This rough and ready red, available from Marks and Spencer’s, was accompanied by an exuberant and well attended opening of a “group exhibition” or so it seemed. Continue reading…

Exhibition: Mike Disfarmer/Kouzaki Hiromu

The Douglas Hyde Gallery, Trinity College Dublin 2
Mike Disfarmer (Gallery 1)
Grandfather’s Envelopes – Works of paper by Kouzaki Hiromu (Gallery 2)
25th of November to 25 January 2012
Opening: Thursday, November 24, 6 – 7:30pm

Two new exhibitions open at the Douglas Hyde on Thursday evening of this week. Gallery 1 hosts a photography exhibition by Mike Disfarmer, while Gallery 2 contains paper-based work by Kouzaki Hiromu. Continue reading…



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